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I'm writing an xml parser and I need to add objects to a class generically, switching on the actual type of the object. Problem is, I'd like to keep to an interface which is simply addElement(BaseClass*) then place the object correctly.

void E_TableType::addElement(Element *e)
{
    QString label = e->getName();
    if (label == "state") {
        state = qobject_cast<E_TableEvent*>(e);
    }
    else if (label == "showPaytable") {
        showPaytable = qobject_cast<E_VisibleType*>(e);
    }
    else if (label == "sessionTip") {
        sessionTip = qobject_cast<E_SessionTip*>(e);
    }
    else if (label == "logoffmedia") {
        logoffMedia = qobject_cast<E_UrlType*>(e);
    }
    else {
        this->errorMessage(e);
    }
}

This is the calling class, an object factory. myElement is an instance of E_TableType.

F_TableTypeFactory::F_TableTypeFactory()
{
    this->myElement = myTable = 0;
}

void F_TableTypeFactory::start(QString qname)
{
     this->myElement = myTable = new E_TableType(qname);
}

void F_TableTypeFactory::fill(const QString& string)
{
  // don't fill complex types.
}

void F_TableTypeFactory::addChild(Element* child)
{
    myTable->addElement(child);
}

Element* F_TableTypeFactory::finish()
{
    return myElement;
}

void F_TableTypeFactory::addAttributes(const QXmlAttributes &attribs) {
    QString tName = attribs.value(QString("id"));
    myTable->setTableName(tName);
}
share|improve this question
3  
The right way is most likely not to. Find a better solution to automatically have the element types do the right thing. –  Xeo Jul 2 '12 at 17:15
    
The element types all have different data, so they only share the same creation interface. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 17:23
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Double-dispatch may be of interest. The table (in your case) would call a virtual method of the base element, which in turns calls back into the table. This second call is made with the dynamic type of the object, so the appropriate overloaded method is found in the Table class.

#include <iostream>

class Table;  //forward declare
class BaseElement
{
public:
   virtual void addTo(Table* t);
};
class DerivedElement1 : public BaseElement
{
   virtual void addTo(Table* t);
};
class DerivedElement2 : public BaseElement
{
   virtual void addTo(Table* t);
};
class Table
{
public:
   void addElement(BaseElement* e){ e->addTo(this); }
   void addSpecific(DerivedElement1* e){ std::cout<<"D1"; } 
   void addSpecific(DerivedElement2* e){ std::cout<<"D2"; } 
   void addSpecific(BaseElement* e){ std::cout<<"B"; } 
};
void BaseElement::addTo(Table* t){ t->addSpecific(this); }
void DerivedElement1::addTo(Table* t){ t->addSpecific(this); }
void DerivedElement2::addTo(Table* t){ t->addSpecific(this); }

int main()
{
Table t;
DerivedElement1 d1;
DerivedElement2 d2;
BaseElement b;

t.addElement(&d1);
t.addElement(&d2);
t.addElement(&b);
}

output: D1D2B

share|improve this answer
    
You rock! I always forget how to do this. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 21:26
    
Just out of laziness, is there a way to use an addTo from the parent class and avoid the re-implementation or does that break the typing system? –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 23:40
    
You can try it with the example code here: failing to implement the method in the derived class breaks this pattern. –  tmpearce Jul 3 '12 at 1:59
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Have you considered using polymorphism here? If a common interface can be implemented by each of your concrete classes then all of this code goes away and things become simple and easy to change in the future. For example:

class Camera {
public:
    virtual void Init() = 0;
    virtual void TakeSnapshot() = 0;
}

class KodakCamera : Camera {
public:
    void Init() { /* initialize a Kodak camera */ };
    void TakeSnapshot() { std::cout << "Kodak snapshot"; }
}

class SonyCamera : Camera {
public:
    void Init() { /* initialize a Sony camera */ };
    void TakeSnapshot() { std::cout << "Sony snapshot"; }
}

So, let's assume we have a system which contains a hardware device, in this case, a camera. Each device requires different logic to take a picture, but the code has to support a system with any supported camera, so we don't want switch statements littered throughout our code. So, we have created an abstract class Camera.

Each concrete class (i.e., SonyCamera, KodakCamera) implementation will incluse different headers, link to different libraries, etc., but they all share a common interface; we just have to decide which one to create up front. So...

std::unique_ptr<Camera> InitCamera(CameraType type) {
    std::unique_ptr<Camera> ret;
    Camera *cam;
    switch(type) {
    case Kodak:
        cam = new KodakCamera();
        break;
    case Sony:
        cam = new SonyCamera();
        break;
    default:
        // throw an error, whatever
        return;
    }

    ret.reset(cam);
    ret->Init();
    return ret;
}

int main(...) {
    // get system camera type
    std::unique_ptr<Camera> cam = InitCamera(cameraType);
    // now we can call cam->TakeSnapshot 
    // and know that the correct version will be called.
}

So now we have a concrete instance that implements Camera. We can call TakeSnapshot without checking for the correct type anywhere in code because it doesn't matter; we know the correct version for the correct hardware will be called. Hope this helped.

Per your comment below:

I've been trying to use polymorphism, but I think the elements differ too much. For example, E_SessionTip has an amount and status element where E_Url just has a url. I could unify this under a property system but then I lose all the nice typing entirely. If you know of a way this can work though, I'm open to suggestions.

I would propose passing the responsibility for writing the XML data to your types which share a common interface. For example, instead of something like this:

void WriteXml(Entity *entity) {
   switch(/* type of entity */) {
      // get data from entity depending
      // on its type and format
   }

   // write data to XML
}

Do something like this:

class SomeEntity : EntityBase {
public:
    void WriteToXml(XmlStream &stream) {
        // write xml to the data stream.
        // the entity knows how to do this,
        // you don't have to worry about what data
        // there is to be written from the outside
    }
private:
    // your internal data
}

void WriteXml(Entity *entity) {
    XmlStream str = GetStream();
    entity->WriteToXml(stream);
}

Does that work for you? I've done exactly this before and it worked for me. Let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
I've been trying to use polymorphism, but I think the elements differ too much. For example, E_SessionTip has an amount and status element where E_Url just has a url. I could unify this under a property system but then I lose all the nice typing entirely. If you know of a way this can work though, I'm open to suggestions. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 18:13
1  
@IslandCow: Can the types themselves be made responsible for formatting the data? What if they all had a WriteData(xml_data_stream *stream) function where you passed in a stream of XML data (or whatever form you may have it in) and they took care of writing to the stream? So instead of asking the instance for its data it asks you for a writable stream and it does its thing. I've done exactly this before and it worked well enough. –  Ed S. Jul 2 '12 at 18:18
    
It's actually a parser, not a writer. If the out functions for all the elements were the same, this would work. However, I'm really just generating a DOM tree with custom types. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 21:41
    
@IslandCow: Ok, but wouldn't that still work? Could each type not implement some function for parsing a blob of Xml? –  Ed S. Jul 2 '12 at 22:28
    
It's not the parsing that's the problem, it's when I need to convert them to actual types to make the data available to the rest of the system. To present a sensible model, I need to be able to place all the children of an element with their actual types. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 23:38
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Have a Look at the Visitor Pattern, it might help you

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking visitor but wasn't quite sure how to make it work. I'll give you an upvote anyway. –  IslandCow Jul 2 '12 at 21:26
    
The Visitor Pattern is implemented using double dispatch, so it looks pretty similar –  duselbaer Jul 3 '12 at 4:49
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