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I have a database with 3 tables:

  • equities
  • stocksplits
  • dividends

There is a one to many relationship between equities and stocksplits, and between equities and dividends. For each equity I would like to show the number of stocksplits and dividends:

SELECT equities.Symbol, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*) 
          FROM stocksplits 
         WHERE stocksplits.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID) as `# Splits`,
       (SELECT COUNT(*) 
          FROM dividends 
         WHERE dividends.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID) as `# Dividends`
FROM equities

The query appears to run fine, though I suspect it is inefficient. How can it be refactored to be faster? No DBMS (SQL query via .net to MySQL server), assume indices exist on the primary ID of each table.

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1  
I believe you're missing the second half of your query –  lc. Jul 2 '12 at 16:43
    
@lc: fixed, thank you. –  Jimmy Jul 2 '12 at 16:45
1  
Can you post some sample data showing where it goes right and where it goes wrong? –  lc. Jul 2 '12 at 16:47
1  
Sounds like you're joining on the wrong columns. –  OMG Ponies Jul 2 '12 at 16:53
    
This question isn't really the type that is encouraged on Stackoverflow. It could be researched elsewhere, has no canonical answer, and similar questions have been answered all of the time. It's also not specific enough to be answered well (no DBMS is mentioned,) and too little information is provided about what type of optimization is desired (indexes? refactoring the query? Running a faster server?) –  David Manheim Jul 2 '12 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

Counting the PKs instead of * might already help:

SELECT equities.Symbol, 
           (SELECT COUNT(stocksplitsID) 
              FROM stocksplits 
             WHERE stocksplits.EquityID =     equity.InstrumentID) as `# Splits`,
           (SELECT COUNT(dividendsid) 
              FROM dividends 
             WHERE dividends.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID) as `# Dividends`
FROM equities
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Here is your original query

SELECT equities.Symbol, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*) 
          FROM stocksplits 
         WHERE stocksplits.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID) as `# Splits`
FROM equities

I was just thinking that an LEFT JOIN would be cleaner

SELECT equities.Symbol,
    SUM(IF(IFNULL(stocksplits.EquityID,0)=0,0,1)) StockSplits,
    SUM(IF(IFNULL(dividends.EquityID  ,0)=0,0,1)) Dividends
FROM
    equities
    LEFT JOIN stocksplits ON equities.InstrumentID = stocksplits.EquityID
    LEFT JOIN dividends   ON equities.InstrumentID = dividends.EquityID
GROUP BY equities.Symbol;

The IFNULL covers any stock that had no stock splits

Give it a Try and see it it runs faster

Let me explain the expression SUM(IF(IFNULL(stocksplits.EquityID,0)=0,0,1))

  • IFNULL will turn a NULL into a 0 if the LEFT JOIN does not have a corresponding entry on the right-side table.
  • if LEFT JOIN had a right-side entry, IF function returns 1
  • if LEFT JOIN has no right-side entry, IF function return 0
  • SUM will add up all the ones and zeros, simulating a COUNT
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I like the idea of speeding things up (my query did feel inefficient); however, the query you suggest does not appear to work (it returns at least 1 for everything?) –  Jimmy Jul 2 '12 at 17:05
    
Also, should the left join not be in the subquery? Let's say I want to add another column, # of dividends (again, another table with one to many relationship with the equities table)... It would need its own left join? –  Jimmy Jul 2 '12 at 17:06
    
I have modified the question to help set context for my comment re: adding another column. –  Jimmy Jul 2 '12 at 17:16
    
Hmm, the query does not work. It returns the same value for both columns (i.e., it returns the number of dividends for both StockSplits and Dividends); and also, it always returns at least 1 (even when it should be 0). –  Jimmy Jul 2 '12 at 17:48
    
Sorry Jimmy, I just changed it from COUNT TO SUM –  RolandoMySQLDBA Jul 2 '12 at 17:52

In my exprience, MySQL's correlated subquery has a poor performance.

Q1 - JOIN

SELECT t1.Symbol, t1.cnt_splits, t2.cnt_dividends
FROM (
    SELECT equities.Symbol AS Symbol, COUNT(*) AS cnt_splits
    FROM equities LEFT JOIN stocksplits
        ON stocksplits.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID
    GROUP BY equities.Symbol
) t1,
(
    SELECT equities.Symbol AS Symbol, COUNT(*) AS cnt_dividends
    FROM equities LEFT JOIN dividends
        dividends.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID
    GROUP BY equities.Symbol
) t2 ON t1.Symbol = t2.Symbol;

Q2 - UNION

Q1 has no correlate subquery and produces as same result as yours. but an extra join is required which needs time. following UNION pattern is faster but output should be converted in client side.

SELECT equities.Symbol AS Symbol, COUNT(*) AS cnt_splits
FROM equities LEFT JOIN stocksplits
    ON stocksplits.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID
GROUP BY equities.Symbol

UNION

SELECT equities.Symbol AS Symbol, COUNT(*) AS cnt_dividends
FROM equities LEFT JOIN dividends
    dividends.EquityID = equities.InstrumentID
GROUP BY equities.Symbol
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