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a=[1,2,3]
b=[4,5,6]
c=[]
d=[]

Whats the difference between these two statements?

c[:]=a
d=b[:]

But both gives the same result.

c is [1,2,3] and d is [4,5,6]

And is there any difference functionality wise?

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4 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

c[:]=a it means replace all the elements of c by elements of a

>>> l = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> l[::2] = [0, 0, 0] #you can also replace only particular elements using this 
>>> l
[0, 2, 0, 4, 0]

>>> k=[1,2,3,4,5]
>>> g=['a','b','c','d']
>>> g[:2]=k[:2] # only replace first 2 elements
>>> g
[1, 2, 'c', 'd']

>>> a=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
>>> c[:]=a      #creates a shallow copy
>>> a[0].append('foo') #changing a mutable object inside a changes it in c too
>>> a
[[1, 2, 3, 'foo'], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> c
[[1, 2, 3, 'foo'], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

d=b[:] means create a shallow copy of b and assign it to d , it is similar to d=list(b)

>>> l = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> m = [1,2,3]
>>> l = m[::-1] 
>>> l
[3,2,1]

>>> l=[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> m=l[:] #creates a shallow copy 
>>> l[0].pop(1) # a mutable object inside l is changed, it affects both l and m
2
>>> l
[[1, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> m
[[1, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
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1  
Very eloquently stated. (+1 from me) –  mgilson Jul 2 '12 at 16:46
    
+1 for very concise and clear explanation –  Levon Jul 2 '12 at 16:48
    
is there any difference functionality wise? –  Never Back Down Jul 2 '12 at 16:49
    
@InternalServerError -- It depends. Do you have other references to c hanging around? Those references will see the changes too. consider: c=[] ; f=c; c[:]=a -- Now f will also have the same elements as a since f and c are the same list. –  mgilson Jul 2 '12 at 16:52
1  
@GrijeshChauhan I am studying from two books Core Python Programming (2nd Edition) and Learning Python, but learned most things from the great folks on SO itself. –  Aशwini चhaudhary May 30 '13 at 14:18
show 5 more comments

What Ashwini said. :) I'll elaborate a little bit:

In [1]: a=[1,2,3]

In [2]: b = a

In [3]: c = a[:]

In [4]: b, c
Out[4]: ([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3])

In [5]: a is b, a is c
Out[5]: (True, False)

and the other way:

In [1]: a = [1,2,3]

In [2]: aold = a

In [3]: a[:] = [4,5,6]

In [4]: a, aold
Out[4]: ([4, 5, 6], [4, 5, 6])

In [5]: a = [7,8,9]

In [6]: a, aold
Out[6]: ([7, 8, 9], [4, 5, 6])

See what happens?

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There isn't much difference. c[:]=a updates the list that c refers to in place. d=b[:] creates a new list which is a copy of b (forgetting the old list you created on the 4th line). In most applications, you're unlikely to see the difference unless you have other references to the arrays sitting around. Of course, with the c[:]=... version, you have to have a list c sitting around already.

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Ashwini's answer accurately describes what is happening, here are a few examples of differences between the two methods:

a=[1,2,3]
b=[4,5,6]
c=[]
c2=c
d=[]
d2=d

c[:]=a                            # replace all the elements of c by elements of a
assert c2 is c                    # c and c2 should still be the same list
c2.append(4)                      # modifying c2 will also modify c
assert c == c2 == [1,2,3,4]
assert c is not a                 # c and a are not the same list

d=b[:]                            # create a copy of b and assign it to d
assert d2 is not d                # d and d2 are no longer the same list
assert d == [4,5,6] and d2 == []  # d2 is still an empty list
assert d is not b                 # d and b are not the same list
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