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In the following codes I try to build a 2D array with c++, but when I run this program it fails.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int obtain_options(  char ** optionLine)
{
   vector< char*> options;
   options.push_back("abc");
   options.push_back("def");


   std::copy(options.begin(), options.end(), const_cast< char**>(optionLine));

   return options.size();
}

int main(int ac, char* av[])
{
    char** optionLine;
    int len;
    optionLine = new char* [2];
    for (int i= 0; i<2; i++)
    {
       optionLine[i] = new char [200];
    }
     obtain_options(optionLine);
    for (int i=0; i<2; i++)
    {
        cout<<optionLine[i]<<endl;
     }

    for (int i=0; i<2; i++)
        delete  [] (optionLine[i]);
    delete []optionLine;

   return 0;

} 

I understand there are some problems with allocating memory to optionLine in function obtain_options(), and if I change obtain_options() in this way, it will work:

int obtain_options(  char ** optionLine)
{
    vector< char*> options;
    char *t1 = new char [100];
    t1[0] = 'a';
    t1[1] = 'b';
    t1[2] = 'c';
    t1[3] = '/0';
   options.push_back(t1);
    char *t2 = new char [100];
    t2[0] = 'd';
    t2[1] = 'e';
    t2[2] = 'f';
    t2[3] = '/0';
   options.push_back(t2);


   std::copy(options.begin(), options.end(), const_cast< char**>(optionLine));

   return options.size();
}

My question is if I do not change obtain_options(), how could I delete the 2D array optionLine in a proper way.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, maybe I'm missing something. Where are you calling obtain_options? –  fatshu Jul 2 '12 at 16:49
    
Where is obtain_options being used? –  Alex Jul 2 '12 at 16:49
    
What is your goal here? My best advice is to simply ditch ALL of your char* and new and just use std::string. Everything should then "just work". –  Chad Jul 2 '12 at 16:49
    
Sorry for the mistake, and I have added the function. –  feelfree Jul 2 '12 at 17:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

your vector contains a set of character pointers. But, the actual memory pointed to by these strings are not continuous as you expect them to be. So, this call will not work as you expect.

std::copy(options.begin(), options.end(), const_cast< char**>(optionLine));

In worst case you could do like this, which is what you almost do yourself now.

for (int i= 0; i<2; i++)
{
     strcpy(optionLine[i],options[i]);
}

But avoid all these memory handling unless you are learning the pointers and allocations.

See how neat you can code this like this in C++:

int obtain_options( vector<string>& anOptions_out)
{
    anOptions_out.push_back("abc");
    anOptions_out.push_back("def");

    return anOptions_out.size();
}

int main(int ac, char* av[])
{
    vector<string> anOptions;
    obtain_options( anOptions );
    for (int i=0; i<anOptions.size(); i++)
    {
        cout<< anOptions[i].c_str() <<endl;
    }

    return 0;
} 

No allocations/deallocations by yourself.

share|improve this answer

Since most people here is concerned in providing the politically correct solution to your perceived problem instead of answering the questions, here is my contribution:

You are not copying the contents of the strings to your manually allocated vectors, instead, you are replacing the pointers you allocated with the pointers inside vector< char*> options;

When you do:

char *a = "abc";

while more technically correct to use const char, it is says a will hold the pointer to the statically allocated C-string "abc" (that is constant). When you do:

options.push_back("abc");

you place this pointer inside the vector, and when you do:

std::copy(options.begin(), options.end(), const_cast< char**>(optionLine));

you simply replace the original pointers in optionsLine with the pointers in options. On the contrary to what Dan Breslau said, there will be no problem returning those pointers from the function, because they are static, i.e. will exist during the whole duration of the program. While using your original obatin_options function, you could simply do this as your main:

int main(int ac, char* av[])
{
   char** optionLine;
   int len;
   optionLine = new char* [2];
   obtain_options(optionLine)
   for (int i=0; i<2; i++)
     {
       cout<<optionLine[i]<<endl;
     }

   delete []optionLine;

   return 0;
}

Note that I didn't allocate the contents of optionLine because it would be lost inside obtain_options(), also obtain_options() is a very unsafe function, because there is no way to ensure the contents will fit it the provided array. It would be safer to pass another parameter, size, with the size of the provided optionLine array, then you must not copy beyond its limits.

int obtain_options(  char ** optionLine, int size)
{
   vector< char*> options;
   options.push_back("abc");
   options.push_back("def");

   if(size > options.size())
      size = options.size();
   std::copy(options.begin(), options.begin() + size, const_cast< char**>(optionLine));

   return size;
}

Or, you should use the much safe solution given by PermanentGuest.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, and this is exactly the answer of the question. –  feelfree Jul 3 '12 at 7:56
    
@feelfree If an answer satisfies you, you should mark it as accepted. The mark is just below the "Up vote"/"Down vote" arrows. –  lvella Jul 3 '12 at 15:48

Your code as posted doesn't call obtain_options. However, I notice that in that function, you're copying character pointers from a local object (options) to the array pointed to by the optionLine argument. That would be a problem, because those pointers will be invalid once you return from obtain_options.

As others have pointed out, the above is a misdiagnosis of the problem.

I see now that your code does this after calling obtain_options:

for (int i=0; i<2; i++)
    delete  [] (optionLine[i]);

This means that it's calling the delete operator on the static pointers that point to "abc" and "def".

"Political correctness" aside, I think my original advice still works:

Try replacing char* with std::string, and replacing char** with vector<std::string>.

share|improve this answer
    
There is no problem in returning those pointers because they point to static data. –  lvella Jul 2 '12 at 17:25
    
@lvella: but there is a problem with deleting them, which is what happens after they're returned. –  Mike Seymour Jul 2 '12 at 18:09
    
@MikeSeymour Yep, and that is exactly the issue of OP's question: how to properly delete optionLine. –  lvella Jul 2 '12 at 18:25

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