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I have a pretty simple HABTM set of models

class Tag < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_and_belongs_to_many :posts
end 

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_and_belongs_to_many :tags

   def tags= (tag_list) 
      self.tags.clear 
      tag_list.strip.split(' ').each do 
        self.tags.build(:name => tag) 
      end
   end 
end

Now it all works alright except that I get a ton of duplicates in the Tags table.

What do I need to do to avoid duplicates (bases on name) in the tags table?

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Do you mean duplicate in the join table (as title suggest) or tags table? –  lulalala Nov 14 '12 at 6:58

8 Answers 8

You can pass the :uniq option as described in the documentation. Also note that the :uniq options doesn't prevent the creation of duplicate relationships, it only ensures accessor/find methods will select them once.

If you want to prevent duplicates in the association table you should create an unique index and handle the exception. Also validates_uniqueness_of doesn't work as expected because you can fall into the case a second request is writing to the database between the time the first request checks for duplicates and writes into the database.

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I tried that, it does not really solve the problem cleanly. I want to avoid exceptions in the first place. I think my solution kind of does that though it needs a bit of tweaking. –  Sam Saffron Jul 15 '09 at 8:04
2  
Note: I already had the unique constraint, which resulted in exceptions, handling them is a huge pain. –  Sam Saffron Jul 15 '09 at 8:05
1  
With the current version of will_paginate (3.0.3) having duplicates in the join table makes it impossible to have unique pagination. –  John Jul 30 '12 at 23:08

In addition the suggestions above:

  1. add :uniq to the has_and_belongs_to_many association
  2. adding unique index on the join table

I would do an explicit check to determine if the relationship already exists. For instance:

post = Post.find(1)
tag = Tag.find(2)
post.tags << tag unless post.tags.include?(tag)
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2  
Clean solution. In your Post model, add def tag=(tag); tags << tag unless tags.include?(tag); end for robustness. –  scarver2 Sep 17 '13 at 6:09
2  
Interestingly enough, has_many association documentation (search for include?) recommends not using the unless ...include?() due to race conditions. I'm guessing the same could hold true for has_and_belongs_to_many. –  spyle Jun 17 at 20:54
    
Anyone got a confirmation for this? –  jj_ Oct 29 at 16:15

Set the uniq option:

class Tag < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_and_belongs_to_many :posts , :uniq => true
end 

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_and_belongs_to_many :tags , :uniq => true
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2  
This doesn't work as expected. You still get duplicate constraint errors when trying to add them via <<. –  Luca Spiller Dec 27 '10 at 22:14
    
I just tried (on Rails 2.3.5), and this is not true. You should make your own question where you supply sufficient information to diagnose your issue. –  Joshua Cheek Dec 28 '10 at 11:05
10  
I thought uniq ignores duplicates on reading but still allows you to write duplicates which would raise an db exception if you have duplicate constraint at the database layer –  Tony Mar 24 '11 at 7:02
    
This won't prevent duplicates, it will just hide them from displaying –  Hallucynogenyc Sep 4 at 13:57

In Rails4:

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base 
  has_and_belongs_to_many :tags, -> { uniq }

(beware, the -> { uniq } must be directly after the relation name, before other params)

Rails documentation

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But after_add callback will be repeated every time again –  Ivan Black Apr 18 at 16:12
    
Could you elaborate on this? Do you mean to say that after_add will still run even in the case that a record is not saved (thanks to {uniq})? –  jj_ Oct 29 at 15:09
    
@nerith If I have another "has_and_belongs_to_many" in the other model referencing the first model, do you think I should set {uniq} there too? –  jj_ Oct 29 at 15:11
    
No! This will still allow to write duplicates to the jointable, check answers above! –  jj_ Oct 29 at 16:13

I would prefer to adjust the model and create the classes this way:

class Tag < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_many :taggings
   has_many :posts, :through => :taggings
end 

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_many :taggings
   has_many :tags, :through => :taggings
end

class Tagging < ActiveRecord::Base 
   belongs_to :tag
   belongs_to :post
end

Then I would wrap the creation in logic so that Tag models were reused if it existed already. I'd probably even put a unique constraint on the tag name to enforce it. That makes it more efficient to search either way since you can just use the indexes on the join table (to find all posts for a particular tag, and all tags for a particular post).

The only catch is that you can't allow renaming of tags since changing the tag name would affect all uses of that tag. Make the user delete the tag and create a new one instead.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I worked around this by creating a before_save filter that fixes stuff up.

class Post < ActiveRecord::Base 
   has_and_belongs_to_many :tags
   before_save :fix_tags

   def tag_list= (tag_list) 
      self.tags.clear 
      tag_list.strip.split(' ').each do 
        self.tags.build(:name => tag) 
      end
   end  

    def fix_tags
      if self.tags.loaded?
        new_tags = [] 
        self.tags.each do |tag|
          if existing = Tag.find_by_name(tag.name) 
            new_tags << existing
          else 
            new_tags << tag
          end   
        end

        self.tags = new_tags 
      end
    end

end

It could be slightly optimised to work in batches with the tags, also it may need some slightly better transactional support.

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This is exactly what the validates_uniqueness_of validator does. However, this solution alone doesn't prevent duplicate items because between your find_by_name and the association, an other request might write to the database. You can use this but you must be aware that some exceptions can occur (because you have an index) and you should catch them. –  Simone Carletti Jul 15 '09 at 8:46
    
not really github.com/rails/rails/blob/… it is a validation that will exception out if there is a dupe, it does not handle it transparently, it has documented concurrency issues, and does need to be used with a unique index to guarantee no dupes. –  Sam Saffron Jul 15 '09 at 10:40

You should add an index on the tag :name property and then use the find_or_create method in the Tags#create method

docs

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Extract the tag name for security. Check whether or not the tag exists in your tags table, then create it if it doesn't:

name = params[:tag][:name]
@new_tag = Tag.where(name: name).first_or_create

Then check whether it exists within this specific collection, and push it if it doesn't:

@taggable.tags << @new_tag unless @taggable.tags.exists?(@new_tag)
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