Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I'm pretty much out of clues by now, not even sure if it's possible after all. I have a Visual C# Form, which gets run by the Program.cs (Standard way - VS did all the setup work of course).

In addition to that, I have a class with a static method in a seperate C# file, just because I like keeping one class in one file.

My form code has a public function:

public void print(String text)
{
    rtb_log.appendText("\n" + text);
}

At a certain point of time, I'm calling the static function from the other class.

Is it possible, to actually access that print method from my other class? Since it's referring to rtb_log ( a rich text box), it's only availible if instanced, and of course not static. But since static methods can only access static members, I'm a little out of ideas here on how to append some text on my form from another class.

Any help here?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

But since static methods can only access static members, I'm a little out of ideas here on how to append some text on my form from another class.

Static members can access instance members - they just need to know which instance to call the method on. So you could write:

public static void Foo(OtherForm myOtherForm)
{
    // Do some stuff...
    myOtherForm.Print(); // Case changed to comply with naming conventions
}

Then when you call the method, you need to supply a reference to the relevant form. Basically something has to determine which instance you want to call Print on. Work out who has that information, and pass it on from there. I would recommend against using a static variable to hold this information. (Global state makes code less reusable, harder to reason about, and harder to test.)

EDIT: Given the comments, it sounds like you want:

// Within the form
private void HandleClick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SomeClass.StaticMethod(this);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, but how do I access the the instance of my main form? I guess that would be the question I'm really not quite aware of. Is there some way to access that instance? It's created in the Program.cs 's main method, using the standart (new Form1()); Also, thanks for pointing out my naming convetion mistake and taking my beginner problems seriously :) –  Eisenhorn Jul 2 '12 at 17:01
    
@Klausklapper: Well if Program is creating a new Form1() then you have a reference to it at that point... but what's calling your static method? To put it another way: if something created multiple instances of your form, how would you expect anything to know which one to call the Print method on? –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 17:02
    
I'm being stupid, of course you're right. Sorry for being so blind. Thank you a lot! [marking your answer right in 1 minute because it won't let me sooner >:C ] –  Eisenhorn Jul 2 '12 at 17:06
    
@Klausklapper: Ah, so it's within the button click? If so, just pass in this, assuming you want it to call back to the same form. –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 17:06
    
And again, thank you very much for helping me out on such a newcomer topic that fast! –  Eisenhorn Jul 2 '12 at 17:10

See below

class SomeMainClass
{
    private ClassB form = null;

    private void SomeMethod()
    {
        form = new ClassB();
        form.Show();
        ClassA foo = new ClassA(this);
    }

    // Use an accessor.
    public ClassB Form
    {
        get { return this.form; }
    }
}

class ClassA
{
    private SomeMainClass mainClass = null;

    // Constructor.
    public ClassA(SomeMainClass _mainClass)
    {
        this.mainClass = _mainClass;
    }

    private void SomeMethod()
    {
        this.mainClass.Form.Print("Something to print");
    }
}

class ClassB : Form
{
    // Constructor.
    public ClassB()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public void Print(String text) 
    {     
        rtb_log.appendText("\n" + text); 
    } 
}   

Edit: This is a basic methodology in response to your comment. It is not that efficent in terms of resources but does what you want...

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, it doesn't. You see, my Form (in your case ClassB) get's instanced at the Program.cs's Main Method, the same way as basicly every simple VC# GUI. I don't have a direct instance name. Or at least I don't know how to access it, since Application.Run(new Form1()); doesn't offer me an instance. And even if it did, I wouldn't be able to access it from my Class A, would I? –  Eisenhorn Jul 2 '12 at 17:03
    
See edit for how to do this... –  Killercam Jul 2 '12 at 17:05
    
Already voted it up. Thank you again :) –  Eisenhorn Jul 2 '12 at 17:11
    
This has been edited to do something like what you require. Note, that there are more effiecnt ways to so this - but I am sure this will do for now... –  Killercam Jul 2 '12 at 17:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.