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Currently, I'm doing it in this fashion:

class Spam(object):

    decorated = None

    @classmethod
    def decorate(cls, funct):
        if cls.decorated is None:
            cls.decorated = []
        cls.decorated.append(funct)
        return funct


class Eggs(Spam):
    pass


@Eggs.decorate
def foo():
    print "spam and eggs"


print Eggs.decorated # [<function foo at 0x...>]
print Spam.decorated # None

I need to be able to do this in a subclass as shown. The problem is that I can't seem to figure out how to make the decorated field not shared between instances. Right now I have a hackish solution by initially setting it to None and then checking it when the function is decorated, but that only works one way. In other words, if I subclass Eggs and then decorate something with the Eggs.decorate function, it affects all subclasses.

I guess my question is: is it possible to have mutable class fields that don't get shared between base and sub classes?

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Just out of curiosity: Why do you need to keep track of which functions have been decorated? –  Lennart Regebro Jul 15 '09 at 11:59
    
Good question. I actually don't, but I devised this scenario as an example for this question because it is a simple reason one would need to be able to access the class. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 15 '09 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured it out through using metaclasses. Thanks for all who posted. Here is my solution if anybody comes across a similar problem:

class SpamMeta(type):

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        SpamType = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)
        SpamType.decorated = []
        return SpamType


class Spam(object):

    __metaclass__ = SpamMeta

    @classmethod
    def decorate(cls, funct):
        cls.decorated.append(funct)
        return funct


class Eggs(Spam):
    pass


@Eggs.decorate
def foo():
    print "spam and eggs"


print Eggs.decorated # [<function foo at 0x...>]
print Spam.decorated # []
share|improve this answer

I'm fairly sure you can't. I thought about doing this with property(), but unfortunately the class of the class itself--where a property would need to go--is ClassType itself.

You can write your decorator like this, but it changes the interface a little:

class Spam(object):
    decorated = {}

    @classmethod
    def get_decorated_methods(cls):
        return cls.decorated.setdefault(cls, [])

    @classmethod
    def decorate(cls, funct):
        cls.get_decorated_methods().append(funct)
        return funct


class Eggs(Spam):
    pass


@Spam.decorate
def foo_and_spam():
    print "spam"

@Eggs.decorate
def foo_and_eggs():
    print "eggs"

print Eggs.get_decorated_methods() # [<function foo_and_eggs at 0x...>]
print Spam.get_decorated_methods() # [<function foo_and_spam at 0x...>]
share|improve this answer
    
I got it to work perfectly with using metaclasses. I posted the answer if you're curious as to how. Thanks for investigating, Glenn. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 15 '09 at 7:27

Not that I have anything against metaclasses, but you can also solve it without them:

from collections import defaultdict

class Spam(object):
    _decorated = defaultdict(list)

    @classmethod
    def decorate(cls, func):
        cls._decorated[cls].append(func)
        return func

    @classmethod
    def decorated(cls):
        return cls._decorated[cls]


class Eggs(Spam):
    pass

@Eggs.decorate
def foo():
    print "spam and eggs"

print Eggs.decorated() # [<function foo at 0x...>]
print Spam.decorated() # []

It is not possible to have properties on class objects (unless you revert to metaclasses again), therefore it is mandatory to get the list of decorated methods via a classmethod again. There is an extra layer of indirection involved compared to the metaclass solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this seems to be similar to how Glenn did it. Even though it works for this example, it still doesn't solve the issue at hand being that I didn't want class fields shared between parent and child. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 15 '09 at 20:46

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