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I need "{" will be single on a line. Therefore I have to use a token that recognize it. This are right examples:

program
{

or

program



{

And this are incorrect examples:

program { 

or

program 
{ sentence;

Then I have a token like this:

TOKEN: { < openKey: "{" >   {System.out.print(image +"\n");}}
SKIP: { < ( " " | "\r" | "\t" | "\n" )+ > }

But I can not think how to make the symbol "{" is exactly between one or more "\n". And after recognized it I have to write exactly:

program
{

If I try:

TOKEN: { < openKey: ( " " | "\r" | "\t" | "\n" )+ "{" ( " " | "\r" | "\t" | "\n" )+ >   {System.out.print(image +"\n");}}

This runs but it writes so many "\n" like there was in the input.

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2 Answers 2

The basic problem is that you're printing the input without any interpretation. In other words, what goes in is what comes out, as you've discovered.

To make it easier to read --- and in order to not be in some respects misusing the lexical analyzer by forcing it to do the entire task --- I recommend moving your print statement down into the parser (e.g., in the Start() function). (I actually tend to move all of my output out of the parser entirely unless I'm doing something really tiny that I'm never going to reuse, but that's for another question.)

Next, to address the actual problem, you have do some interpretation to get from a bunch of newlines to just one. The simplest way to do that is a basic replaceAll. Here's my Start() function, where openKey is defined just as you've done, and WORD is simply a concatenation of letters.

void Start() : 
{
  Token t;
}
{
    ( 
      t = <WORD>
      {System.out.print((t.image).replaceAll("(\n)+","\n"));}
    )*
    (
            t = <openKey>
            {System.out.print((t.image).replaceAll("(\n)+","\n"));}
            ( 
              t = <WORD>
              {System.out.print((t.image).replaceAll("(\n)+","\n"));}
            )*
    )*
    <EOF>

}

So basically, this takes zero or more words, followed by the unit that consists of 1 or more newlines followed by the left curly brace followed by 1 or more newlines, followed by zero or more words, and outputs the words, the curly brace, and just 1 newline per 1-or-more-newline set.

If you can start a file with a curly brace, instead of requiring a word, then it outputs and empty line, a curly brace, and a newline. I don't know if that's what you want, being able to begin the output with an empty line, so you will need to play with the output code to get the exact formatting you're going for, plus, as you can see you've got some very nice repeated code in there that could be extracted into a function, so I leave that for an exercise for the reader.

Anyway, the basic premise of this answer is --- and I believe this is really something a maxim for the ages, suitable for use in all areas of life, not just coding --- "Unless you change what you take in before outputting it, it's going to be exactly what you took in!"

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I did it differently:

TOKEN: { < openKey: "\n" (" " | "\t")* "{" (" " | "\t")* ("\r" | "\n") >{System.out.print("{\r\n");}}   
SKIP: { " " | "\r" | "\t" | "\n" }

There were some problems with the carriage return, but this way works well.

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