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When I draw a figure using matplotlib how do I save it without extra margins? Usually when I save it as

plt.savefig("figure.png") # or .pdf

I get it with some margins:

enter image description here

Example:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import networkx as nx

G=nx.Graph()

G.add_edge('a','b',weight=1)
G.add_edge('a','c',weight=1)
G.add_edge('a','d',weight=1)
G.add_edge('a','e',weight=1)
G.add_edge('a','f',weight=1)
G.add_edge('a','g',weight=1)

pos=nx.spring_layout(G)
nx.draw_networkx_nodes(G,pos,node_size=1200,node_shape='o',node_color='0.75')

nx.draw_networkx_edges(G,pos,
                width=2,edge_color='b')

plt.axis('off')
plt.savefig("degree.png", bbox_inches="tight")
plt.show() 

Update 2:

The spaces are set inside the axes.. This is clear if I remove plt.axis('off')
So I think there is some trick to use with the package Networkx.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

add the codes below to control plot limits before saving.

try different values of cut, like from 1.05 to 1.50, until you see fit.

# adjust the plot limits
cut = 1.05
xmax= cut*max(xx for xx,yy in pos.values())
ymax= cut*max(yy for xx,yy in pos.values())
plt.xlim(0,xmax)
plt.ylim(0,ymax)
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Thank you very much. It works but with removing some small part of the limits of the figure. I do not get the figure complete. So i think i just need to modify it somehow. –  Aya Jul 2 '12 at 20:03
2  
you can try a more conservative cut (1.10 or 1.05 rather than 1.02), just change it until the canvas fits. –  nye17 Jul 2 '12 at 20:04
    
I would still prefer another method that automatically fix boundaries. I think this will be with Networkx , because of the node shape –  Aya Jul 2 '12 at 20:36
1  
@Aya you may want to ask the question on the networkx mailinglist, and also, you can try to wrap the above codes into a function so that you call it with whatever cut you want without copy&paste all the time. –  nye17 Jul 2 '12 at 22:51
1  
NetworkX has to figure what the x limits are and y limits are based on the data and the node shape. There is just some simple padding of the exact data values to account for the node shape. You can adjust that using plt.xlim() and plt.ylim() as described above. Calling those functions with no arguments will give you the current limits. –  Aric Jul 4 '12 at 13:44

Try plt.savefig("figure.png", bbox_inches="tight").

Edit: Ah, you didn't mention you were using networkx (although now I see it's listed in a tag). bbox_inches="tight" is the way to crop the figure tightly. I don't know what networkx is doing, but I imagine it's setting some plot parameters that are adding extra space to the axes. You should look for a solution in networkx rather than matplotlib. (It may be, for instance, that networkx is adding the space inside the axes, not the figure; what does it look like if you remove that axis('off') call?)

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this is actually does not change the margins. thank you –  Aya Jul 2 '12 at 18:16
    
Can you give an example of what you mean by "margins"? –  BrenBarn Jul 2 '12 at 18:22
    
thank you. I do not want the figure to be saved with extra white spaces. I just want the borders to close the limits of the figure exactly. Is this clear? –  Aya Jul 2 '12 at 18:34
    
This is exactly what bbox_inches="tight" does. Can you explain how it doesn't do what you want? Also what version of matplotlib are you using? –  BrenBarn Jul 2 '12 at 19:29
    
I have put an example. Thank you.. –  Aya Jul 2 '12 at 19:40

Without knowing the specifics of networkx I cannot be certain that this will work, but to remove the whitespace completely from the outside of an axes in matplotlib, you can do something along the lines of:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
ax = plt.axes([0, 0, 1, 1])
plt.plot(range(10))
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