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I'm learning Java at work, and the exercise we're supposed to do states the following:

Create a class representing a die. Create a method to roll the die (random number from 1 to 6)

Also override the equals and toString methods provided by the Object class.

Coming straight from C++ with no Java experience, I think the first part is relatively straightforward. However, I'm not sure how to override equals and toString methods?

Here is my code so far, any advice would be greatly appreciated:

package this;

import java.lang.Object;
public class Die
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
    int die;
    die = (int)(Math.random()*6 + 1);
    System.out.println (die);
    }
}
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2  
That is not a class representing a die. That is a class that tries to simulate a die. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 2 '12 at 18:16
    
random(5) + 1 is the correct way to do the random function –  Matt Westlake Jul 2 '12 at 18:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A Die instance should represent a die. The Die class should not be a procedural application that launches a die.

A Die has a state, which is its current face value (1 to 6). Rolling it should make it go from its current face value to another one.

Its toString() method could say that it's a die, and say its current face value. I don't really see the point in overriding equals(), because I don't see why a die should ever be equal to another die. But you could choose to make two dies equal if they have the same face value.

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Overriding equals() tells what actually makes two Objects equal. If you don't override equals(), the default equals which uses == is used. Overriding toString() gives the programmer the opportunity to define what's printed out when the Object is printed. If toString() is not overridden, the default is used which is a string consisting of the name of the class of which the object is an instance, the at-sign character @, and the unsigned hexadecimal representation of the hash code of the object.

Let say i have an object Die

public class Die
{
    private Long id;

    private String face;

/**
 * @return the id
 */
public Long getId() {
    return id;
}

/**
 * @param id the id to set
 */
public void setId(Long id) {
    this.id = id;
}
/**
 * @return the face
 */
public String getFace()
{
    return face;
}

/**
 * @param face the face to set
 */
public void setFace(String face)
{
    this.face = face;
}
//Overriding toString
    /**
     * @see java.lang.Object#toString()
     */
    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return "The value of the Die Face is = " + getFace();
    }
    //Overriding equals
    @Override
    public boolean equals(final Object obj)
    {
        if (obj instanceof Die)
        {
            Die val = (Die) obj;
            return (val.getFace().equals(this.face));
        }
        return false;
    }

}

Let me know if you have issues.

share|improve this answer
    
die.setFace("OOP is about encapsulation"); –  JB Nizet Jul 2 '12 at 18:31
    
I'm beginning to understand this better. Java and C++ are similar, but it is literally my first day working with Java, so I feel like it's out of my scope. So, after this I would add "public static void main(String args[])" and call a method to roll the die? –  TimeBomb006 Jul 2 '12 at 18:35
    
Yes. The main method would create an instance of Die (Die theDie = new Die()), and then roll the die as many times it wants. Don't use the above code as a good example: it doean't encapsulate the rolling of a die, and has an ID which doesn't serve any purpose. –  JB Nizet Jul 2 '12 at 18:42
2  
By the way, if you're overriding the equals() method, it's good practice to also override the hashCode() method. The hashCode() method is what Java uses to (among other things), determine which bucket an object should land in when placed into a Map or Hashtable. If you don't override hashCode() to return the same value when two object instances return true from equals(), you won't be able to reliably retrieve object back from a Hashtable. More details from IBM here –  David Jul 2 '12 at 19:24
    
@David You are right. But the answer was based on user1496816 question. –  Uchenna Nwanyanwu Jul 3 '12 at 8:29
public class Die {
  int value;
  public Die() {
    roll;
  }

  public void roll() {
    value = (int)(Math.random()*5 + 1)
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    return "The current value is: " + value;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is an immutable Die.

public class Die {

    private int face;

    private Die(int face) {
       this.face = face;
    } 
    public static Die roll() {
       return new Die(Math.random(5) + 1);
    } 

    private int getFace() {
        return face;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return "Die:" + face;
    }

    public boolean equals(Object obj)   {
       if (obj instanceof Die) {
             return face == ((Die) obj).getFace();
       } else {
             return false;
       }
     }

     public int hashCode() {
         return die;
     }
}
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The Java tutorial on overriding methods would be a good place to start.

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package this;

import java.lang.Object;
public class Die
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
    int die;
    die = (int)(Math.random()*6 + 1);
    System.out.println (die);
    }
}

Should look more like this:

package com.example;

//don't need to import anything in the java.lang package you get this for free  

public class Die  
{  
      private int value; //defaults to 0  

     public static void main(String[] args)  
     {  
         Die die = new Die();  
         die.roll();
         System.out.println(die.toString());
     }  

     public String toString()  
     {
         return "Value: " + value;  
     }
     public int getValue()  
     {
       return this.value;  
     }
     public void roll()  
     {  
        this.value=(int)(Math.random(5)+1);
     } 

public boolean equals(Object obj)   {
       if (obj instanceof Die) {
             return value== ((Die) obj).getValue();
       } else {
             return false;
       }
     }

     public int hashCode() {
         return die;
     }


}  
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