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What is the most efficient way to clone a JavaScript object?

I have an object like this:

User = {    
  name: "user",
  settings: {
    first: "1",
    second: "2"    
  }    
}

and a second one:

user1 = {
  name: "user1",
  settings: {
    second: "3"
  }
}

now I want to copy user1's custom values into User, using:

    for(var key in user1){
        User[key] = user1[key];
    }

the result User will be:

User = {
  name: "user1",
  settings: {
    second: "3"
  }
}

User.settings has been entirely replace while I wanted only settings.second to be replaced.

How to achieve this, without knowing how much child object the main object have?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bergi, jusio, Peter O., Frank van Puffelen, Brian Mains Dec 7 '12 at 16:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Use recursion? Have you searched for deep Object.copy functions? –  Bergi Jul 2 '12 at 18:42
    
Can you use jQuery? –  Ja͢ck Jul 2 '12 at 18:55
    
Because of how javascript passes objects around (by reference), deep copying a nested object is actually quite an ordeal. I'd follow @Bergi's advice and find a pre-existing one. –  Mike Robinson Jul 2 '12 at 18:55
2  
"This question has been asked before and already has an answer." So I ask to the moderators, where? Where has it been asked before? Why do you put the burden on the user to dig around and find it? –  Dave Jensen May 15 '14 at 21:29
    
would this implementation do the work? –  yazjisuhail Nov 10 '14 at 4:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I've found that the best way to go is this:

http://andrewdupont.net/2009/08/28/deep-extending-objects-in-javascript/

Object.deepExtend = function(destination, source) {
  for (var property in source) {
    if (typeof source[property] === "object" &&
     source[property] !== null ) {
      destination[property] = destination[property] || {};
      arguments.callee(destination[property], source[property]);
    } else {
      destination[property] = source[property];
    }
  }
  return destination;
};


Object.extend(destination, source);

What about this?

    function clone(destination, source) {
        for (var property in source) {
            if (typeof source[property] === "object" && source[property] !== null && destination[property]) { 
                clone(destination[property], source[property]);
            } else {
                destination[property] = source[property];
            }
        }
    };
share|improve this answer
1  
arguments.callee is deprecated. You should really use a named function. Also, you forgot about hasOwnProperty which is quite essential. –  Bergi Jul 3 '12 at 12:49
    
see the update, is it better? –  Matteo Pagliazzi Jul 3 '12 at 14:30
    
Yes, although you still copy properties from the prototype. And copying to a destination object really should be called "extend", not "clone" (the "deepextend" from your first try would be even better) –  Bergi Jul 3 '12 at 15:36
    
My solution accounts for all of this ;) A plus one would be nice, atleast. –  Jon Jaques Jul 5 '12 at 2:38
2  
what about arrays (with nested objects)? –  Eliran Malka Aug 19 '13 at 13:58

Grabbed jQuery's extend method, and made it library agnostic.

Gist: Library agnostic version of jQuery's Extend

Its wrapped in an Extender constructor, so you don't have to instantiate all of its internal methods each time you call the extend method.

Disclaimer: I have not tested this extensively. It's basically a 1:1 clone of jQuery's extend(), however your mileage may vary.

Use it like this.

var user1 = {
  name: "user1",
  settings: {
    first: "1",
      second: {bar: 'foo'}
  }
};
var user2 = {
  name: "user2",
  settings: {
    second: {foo:'bar'}
  }
};

/* merge user1 into User */
__extend(true, user1, user2);

// Modifies the User object
user1.settings.second.foo == 'bar'; // true

// note, you can do assignment too.
var newUser = __extend(true, user1, user2);

See here for more documentation

share|improve this answer
    
This might be lengthier than other solutions but it works reliably, and works on both array and object types. Thank you! –  Kyle Somogyi Jan 2 '14 at 18:52

This is really hacky, but this should work. I suggest doing as the other users have suggested in the comments; find a pre-existing library that will do this for you.

for(var key in user1){  
   var temp = User[key]
   User[key] = user1[key];   
   for(var key1 in temp){
      if(User[key][key1] == null){
         User[key][key1] = temp[key1];
      }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
the object i posted was an example i'm in search of something that will work everywhere –  Matteo Pagliazzi Jul 2 '12 at 19:23
1  
O ok. Well I would take a look at jQuerys api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend, it looks like it may do exactly what your looking for. –  Phillip Whisenhunt Jul 2 '12 at 19:25
    
i've found this which seems to be working (not perfect but a start) my.opera.com/GreyWyvern/blog/show.dml/1725165, for jquery I'd like to kkep it framework agnostic –  Matteo Pagliazzi Jul 2 '12 at 21:39
    
Be aware that this is very simple approach and you may run into some limitations - described here stackoverflow.com/questions/8092548/… –  Mikko Ohtamaa Jul 2 '12 at 22:51

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