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I've modified a raytracer I wrote a while ago for educational purposes to take advantage of multiprocessing using OpenMP. However, I'm not seeing any profit from the parallelization.

I've tried 3 different approaches: a task-pooled environment (the draw_pooled() function), a standard OMP parallel nested for loop with image row-level parallelism (draw_parallel_for()), and another OMP parallel for with pixel-level parallelism (draw_parallel_for2()). The original, serial drawing routine is also included for reference (draw_serial()).

I'm running a 2560x1920 render on an Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 (2 cores @ 2,67GHz each w/Hyper-Threading) and 4GB of RAM under Linux, binary compiled by gcc with libgomp. The scene takes an average of:

  • 120 seconds to render in series,
  • but 196 seconds (sic!) to do so in parallel in 2 threads (the default - number of CPU cores), regardless of which of the three particular methods above I choose,
  • if I override OMP's default thread number with 4 to take HT into account, the parallel render times drop to 177 seconds.

Why is this happening? I can't see any obvious bottlenecks in the parallel code.

EDIT: Just to clarify - the task pool is only one of the implementations, please do read the question - scroll down to see the parallel fors. Thing is, they are just as slow as the task pool!

void draw_parallel_for(int w, int h, const char *fname) {
    unsigned char *buf;

    buf = new unsigned char[w * h * 3];

    Scene::GetInstance().PrepareRender(w, h);

    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
        #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(4)
        for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
            Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }

    write_png(buf, w, h, fname);

    delete [] buf;
}

void draw_parallel_for2(int w, int h, const char *fname) {
    unsigned char *buf;

    buf = new unsigned char[w * h * 3];

    Scene::GetInstance().PrepareRender(w, h);

    int x, y;
    #pragma omp parallel for private(x, y) num_threads(4)
    for (int xy = 0; xy < w * h; ++xy) {
        x = xy % w;
        y = xy / w;
        Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }

    write_png(buf, w, h, fname);

    delete [] buf;
}

void draw_parallel_for3(int w, int h, const char *fname) {
    unsigned char *buf;

    buf = new unsigned char[w * h * 3];

    Scene::GetInstance().PrepareRender(w, h);

    #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(4)
    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
        for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
            Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }

    write_png(buf, w, h, fname);

    delete [] buf;
}


void draw_serial(int w, int h, const char *fname) {
    unsigned char *buf;

    buf = new unsigned char[w * h * 3];

    Scene::GetInstance().PrepareRender(w, h);

    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
        for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
            Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }

    write_png(buf, w, h, fname);

    delete [] buf;
}

std::queue< std::pair<int, int> * > task_queue;

void draw_pooled(int w, int h, const char *fname) {
    unsigned char *buf;

    buf = new unsigned char[w * h * 3];

    Scene::GetInstance().PrepareRender(w, h);

    bool tasks_issued = false;
    #pragma omp parallel shared(buf, tasks_issued, w, h) num_threads(4)
    {
        #pragma omp master
        {
            for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
                for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
                    task_queue.push(new std::pair<int, int>(x, y));
            }
            tasks_issued = true;
        }

        while (true) {
            std::pair<int, int> *coords;
            #pragma omp critical(task_fetch)
            {
                if (task_queue.size() > 0) {
                    coords = task_queue.front();
                    task_queue.pop();
                } else
                    coords = NULL;
            }

            if (coords != NULL) {
                Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(coords->first, coords->second,
                    buf + (coords->second * w + coords->first) * 3);
                delete coords;
            } else {
                #pragma omp flush(tasks_issued)
                if (tasks_issued)
                    break;
            }
        }
    }

    write_png(buf, w, h, fname);

    delete [] buf;
}
share|improve this question
    
All parallelizing is going to result in some overhead. Sometimes the overhead is more than the cost of just doing a sequential call. There don't have to be bottlenecks for the parallel code to perform worse. – NominSim Jul 2 '12 at 19:03
    
Are you sure your OpenMP code is corrent? I've used quite a lot of OpenMP but I've never seen it used that way... I've never seen anything like: #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(4) for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x) Shouldn't that be more like: int x; #pragma omp parallel for private(x) for(x = 0; x < w; ++x) – MFH Jul 2 '12 at 19:08
    
I understand that, however, the tracing of a single pixel is quite an expensive operation. It did occur to me that the tasks might be too finely grained (i.e. rendering one pixel may not be expensive enough to justify the threading overhead), but after making the granularity more coarse (switch to one image row per thread, as opposed to one pixel per thread) the performance doesn't improve. – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 19:27
    
Well, I've been just following this tutorial: bisqwit.iki.fi/story/howto/openmp/#LoopDirectiveFor And the examples from there run fine and are definitely parallel (i.e. print stuff out of serial order etc.). – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 19:33
1  
@MFH, this is C++ (there is even a c++ tag) code. Besides OpenMP does implicit privatisation of parallel for loop control variables, and not only in C++. – Hristo Iliev Jul 2 '12 at 20:14

You have a critical section inside your innermost loop. In other words, you're hitting a synchronization primitive per pixel. That's going to kill performance.

Better split the scene in tiles and work one on each thread. That way, you have a longer time (a whole tile's worth of processing) between synchronizations.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, but that's just the task-pooled approach, and I sure intend to improve the task granularity. Why are the parallel fors just as slow, though? – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 19:30
    
Why do people upvote this, the answer is not helpful. :( – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 19:50
1  
@IneQuation: Because you don't understand it does not mean it is not helpful. Please enlighten us as to what #pragma omp critical( name ) actually does... – JimR Jul 2 '12 at 19:57
    
I understand it, and I already said I mean to improve it in this way, but I still don't know why the regular parallel loops are just as slow! The critical section in the task pool is there because the STL queue is not thread-safe and I'm popping an element off it. – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 20:23

If the pixels are independent you don't actually need any locking. You can just divide up the image into rows or columns and let the threads work on their own. For example, you could have each thread operate on every nth row (pseudocode):

for(int y = TREAD_NUM; y < h; y += THREAD_COUNT)
    for(int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
        render_pixel(x,y);

Where THREAD_NUM is a unique number for each thread such that 0 <= THREAD_NUM < THREAD_COUNT. Then after you join your threadpool, perform the png conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm doing precisely that in the other implementations. Look at the draw_parallel_for() functions in my code. The thing is, they're just as slow as the task pool! – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 19:47
    
Your granulation is much smaller in draw_parallel_for. You're spawning and joining threads on every row rather than once for the entire image. – smocking Jul 2 '12 at 20:02
    
And it's much more coarse in draw_parallel_for3, where there's an entire row per thread. It's still just as slow as the others. – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 20:26
    
OK it does seem draw_parallel_for2 works with larger granulation. It might depend on your implementation of Scene::GetInstance() and or RenderPixel(). For instance, you might be constructing multiple instances if your GetInstance() is not thread-safe. I've used the row-level parallelism in the answer a few years ago on a large cluster with MPI and was able to get a linear speed-up. The cluster could render several frames per second this way, even with network overhead. – smocking Jul 2 '12 at 20:30
    
Hmm... Indeed GetInstance() is a not thread-safe singleton accessor, however, by the time the code gets to the parallel section, it's been called a few times from the single thread, so there is already a cached reference to the scene object... I'll check if it really is the same object all the time. – IneQuation Jul 3 '12 at 6:33

There is always an performance overhead while creating threads. OMP Parallel inside a for loop will obviously generate lot of overhead. For example, in your code

void draw_parallel_for(int w, int h, const char *fname) {

    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {

    // Here There is a lot of overhead
         #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(4)
         for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
              Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }
 }

It can be re-written as

void draw_parallel_for(int w, int h, const char *fname) {


    #pragma omp parallel for num_threads(4)
    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
           for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
              Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }
 }

or

void draw_parallel_for(int w, int h, const char *fname) {


    #pragma omp parallel num_threads(4)
    for (int y = 0; y < h; ++y) {
           #pragma omp for
           for (int x = 0; x < w; ++x)
              Scene::GetInstance().RenderPixel(x, y, buf + (y * w + x) * 3);
    }
 }

By this way, you will eliminate the overhead

share|improve this answer
    
Have you read the question? I did try that, it's there, draw_parallel_for2 and draw_parallel_for3. It's just as slow. – IneQuation Jul 2 '12 at 20:24
    
I pointed out the overhead due to creation of threads and have suggested two ways to eliminate that overhead. – veda Jul 10 '12 at 14:16

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