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I would like to encrypt a 10 Character (alpha-numeric only) string into a 16 or 32 character alpha-numeric string.

The string I am encrypting is an asset tag. So in itself it carries no information, but I would like to hide all valid possible strings within a larger group of possible strings. I was hoping that encrypting the string would be a good way to do this.

Is it possible to do this with the Python PyCrypto library?

Here is an example I found regarding using PyCrypto.

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Don't you want cryptographic hashes? –  Linuxios Jul 2 '12 at 19:07
    
maybe. Can you elaborate? –  michael Jul 2 '12 at 19:11
    
Cryptographic hashes are a one-way function that takes a variable length input and produces a unique, fixed length output. Popular implementations are SHA and MD5. –  Linuxios Jul 2 '12 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're better off with simple hashing (which is like one way encryption). To do this just use the md5 function to make a digest and then base64 or base16 encode it. Please note that base64 strings can include +, = or /.

import md5
import base64

def obfuscate(s):
    return base64.b64encode( md5.new(s).digest())

def obfuscate2(s):
    return base64.b16encode( md5.new(s).digest())

# returns alphanumeric string but strings can also include slash, plus or equal i.e. /+=
print obfuscate('Tag 1')
print obfuscate('Tag 2')
print obfuscate('Tag 3')

# return hex string
print obfuscate2('Tag 1')

As has been commented md5 is rapidly losing its security, so if you want to have something more reliable for the future, use the SHA-2 example below.

import hashlib

def obfuscate(s):
    m = hashlib.sha256()
    m.update(s)
    return m.hexdigest()

print obfuscate('Tag 1')
print obfuscate('Tag 2')
print obfuscate('Tag 3')

One more function - this time generate about 96-bit* digest using SHA-2 and truncating the output so that we can restrict it to 16 alphanum chars. This give slightly more chance of collision but should be good enough for most practical purposes.

import hashlib
import base64

def obfuscate(s):
    m = hashlib.sha256()
    m.update(s)
    hash = base64.b64encode(m.digest(), altchars="ZZ")  # make one way base64 encode, to fit characters into alphanum space only
    return hash[:16]    # cut of hash at 16 chars - gives about 96 bits which should 
    # 96 bits means 1 in billion chance of collision if you have 1 billion tags (or much lower chance with fewer tags)
    # http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birthday_attack

print obfuscate('Tag 1')
print obfuscate('Tag 2')
print obfuscate('Tag 3')

*The actual digest is only 95.2 bits as we use 62 character alphabet for encoding.

>>> math.log(62**16,2)
95.26714096618998
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1  
MD5 is widely considered broken (see e.g. its wikipedia article, or Bruce Schneier's writings). It might not matter much in this particular instance, but generally it seems better to use another hashing function like SHA-2 or the scrypt key derivation function. –  Roland Smith Jul 2 '12 at 20:11
    
Valid point in general - and to help me break the bad habit of using md5, I've also included SHA-2 example now. –  Maria Zverina Jul 2 '12 at 20:15
    
michael asks about encryption and PyCrypto library but not about hashes –  Maksym Polshcha Jul 2 '12 at 20:18
    
Michael asks to hide the information - and mentions that encrypting could be a good way to solve this - i've provided alternate valid solution that avoids encryption headaches. :) –  Maria Zverina Jul 2 '12 at 20:20
1  
It would be useful to see an example of restricting the total number of characters to some amount. I hope to hide 10 alpha-numeric only character asset tags in a maximum of 32 alpha-numeric only characters. Preferably 16. The hashed string goes into a QRCode. –  michael Jul 2 '12 at 20:31

To make a string longer, you could try the following;

  • first compress it with bzip2
  • then make it readable again with base64 encoding

Like this:

import bz2
import base64
base64.b64encode(bz2.compress('012345'))

This will yield:

'QlpoOTFBWSZTWeEMDLgAAAAIAH4AIAAhgAwDJy7i7kinChIcIYGXAA=='

Due to the bzip2 header, the first 13 character will always be the same, so you should discard them;

base64.b64encode(bz2.compress('012345'))[14:]

This gives:

 'EMDLgAAAAIAH4AIAAhgAwDJy7i7kinChIcIYGXAA=='

Note that this is not cryptographically secure; it is trivial to invert if you know the recipe that is used:

foo = base64.b64encode(bz2.compress('012345'))
bz2.decompress(base64.b64decode(foo))

gives:

'012345'
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