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Suppose I have a piece of code like this:

int foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
    int tmp1, tmp2, tmp3;
    ...
    some_calculation0(&tmp1, a, b); // stores the result in tmp1
    some_calculation1(&tmp2, b, c);
    some_calculation2(&tmp3, tmp1, tmp2);

    return tmp3;
}

Lately I would write this as:

int foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
    int tmp[3];
    ...
    some_calculation0(&tmp[0], a, b); // stores the result in tmp[0]
    some_calculation1(&tmp[1], b, c);
    some_calculation2(&tmp[2], tmp[0], tmp[1]);

    return tmp[2];
}

Is there any reason not to do something like this? Would anyone consider it poor practice?

In this case the tmp values are really intermediate values in a string of computations, since all the functions return their result in one of the input variables passed by reference. To me it made sense to group them together, but seeing as the response so far has been against it, I have nothing against using separate variables.

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Why would you do this? –  ouah Jul 2 '12 at 19:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This interferes with the readability of your code. Variable names should provide some information about their usage.

While using tmp as a variable name is occasionally useful and reasonable, using an array of tmp in this way gives no indication about how the variables are being used: you're hiding the details of your calculations behind an opaque name/structure. Furthermore I need to keep track of indices to figure out what's going on in the code, which is confusing, and is prone to programmer error.

It takes no more effort to pick specific variable names, and if the variables really have no better name than tmpX, then prefer common conventions, for instance, x, y, z as iterators, index or idx for indices, etc..

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This is highly subjective, but I would certainly oppose to the style in the second snippet. I think that unless you need the features of arrays (ie. continuous storage + array-pointer decay), you should make all variables scalar and name them sensibly, so it's not tmp1,tmp2 and tmp3. I find your second snippet both little harder to type and harder to read (and having more possibilities of error).

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There is another variant: use the return value for what it was intended for:

int foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
    int part_a, part_b, result;
    ...
    part_a = some_calculation0( a, b);
    part_b = some_calculation1( b, c);
    result = some_calculation2( part_a, part_b);

    return result;
}

And there is another, rather cryptic version possible (this trusts some_calculation[01] to be pure functions; without side effects):

int foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
    int result;
    ...

    result = some_calculation2( some_calculation0( a, b)
                              , some_calculation1( b, c));

    return result;
}

Or even:

int foo(int a, int b, int c)
{
    ...
    return some_calculation2( some_calculation0( a, b)
                            , some_calculation1( b, c));
}

There is a logical "performance" reason to use the return value: at the end of the called function, just before the return, the compiler will have the result ready somewhere in a register. The calling function in most cases expects all the general-purpose registers to be used (and their contents destroyed) by the subfunction. But not the return value, on most architectures there as a convention to return the returnvalue in a register (AX, or DX+AX on an x86) That is a nice cheap rendez-vous point for the caller and callee...

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i mentioned in the OP that the some_calculation functions all return their result in one of their inputs. Obviously if I could change their signature I could do what you're suggesting, but i cannot. –  cdk Jul 2 '12 at 20:40
    
In that case, you are grounded. And the identifiers don't matter, The objects will be out of scope once the function returns, anyway. BTW: why are the functions int, when they are don't return anything sensible? Dusty deck? BTW2: Sorry: oops, I must have read too fast... BTW3: well, at least I proposed some nice names for the temps! –  wildplasser Jul 2 '12 at 20:44

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