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I have some classes.

In the facade I have an starter class which is instantiated and calls all the methods from there.

Then I have a car class, and owner class, a garage class and a parking space class

So... Starter has a Car attribute.
Car has an Owner attribute.
Car also has a Garage attribute.
Garage has a ParkingSpace attribute

Stater class has a getOwner() method which calls the getOwner() method in the Car class

private Car car;
public Starter (String name){
    car = new Car(new Owner(name);
}

The third line above instantiates the Car and the Owner object. And this now allows me to call the various methods from the various classes.

I now have an addParking() method in Starter Class. addParking() from the Starter Class calls addParking() from the Car Class, whihc in turn calls the addParking() from the GarageClass which is then were the parking space is added to the collection stored in the Garage Class.

What I fail to understand is... how do I now instantiate the Garage object and in terms of what do I instantiate it? My addParking() method works up to Car, because I have already instantiated this when I got the Owner. So I cannot now go...

Car car = new Car(new Grarage(new ParkingSpace(int x, int y, int z)));

Or can I? Wont this create a whole new Car object?

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1  
Why don't you call a method on Car which adds the Garage. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 2 '12 at 19:34

2 Answers 2

how do I now instantiate the Garage object and in terms of what do I instantiate it?

Usually, when I get stuck with such questions, I go back to nature and to my domain model. The Garage class should be coupled with only a parking space as a Garage must have a parking space but it might not have a Car or an in it (yet).

public class Garage{
  public Garage(ParkingSpace parkingSpace){
     //...
  }
}

Now, you can park a Car in this Garage so it makes sense for the Garage to have a method:

public void park(Car car){
}

These bits of code can now be linked in the following way:

Car car = new Car(owner);
Garage garage = new Garage(new ParkingSpace(...));
garage.park(car);

Wont this create a whole new Car object?

Yes, Car car = new Car(new Grarage(new ParkingSpace(int x, int y, int z))); will create a new Car, Garage and a ParkingSpace

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if you call the constructor for sure you'll create a new instance of Garage. I think you'd better keep the default constructors and provide getters and setters or adder methods (are your cars stored in a collection?) to the Garage to create the relationships among yourr objects: later on you can think about which relationships cannot be destroyed, erase the setter and create the relationship through the constructor.

   class Garage { 

    public Garage(){}

    private ParkingSpace ps;

    public void setParkingSpace(ParkingSpace ps){
      this.ps = ps;
    }

    public ParkingSpace getParkingSpace(){
      return ps;
    }
    public void addCar(Car car){
     // add  to some collection...
     }
    public void removeCar(Car car){
      // and remove...
     }
    }

The lifecycle of your objects seem to be quite distinct. I would istantiate the ParkingSpace and the Park separately from the Car, and create the relationship with a setter only when you need it. You need to think 2 things: 1) what do I need to create a object? Which other objects does it depend on? 2) it your relationship read only or read-write? It does not seem like you need a Park to istantiate a Car. If this is not the case create the Park before having the Car, it's the only other way around.

    class ParkingSpace{
        private int x;
        private int y;
        private int z;

      public ParkingSpace(int x, int y,int z){
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.z = z;
     }

     //... other methods
    }

    class  Park {

       private final List<ParkingSpace> parkingSpaces = new ArrayList<ParkingSpace>();

       public void addParkSpace(ParkingSpace ps){
         parkingSpaces.add(ps);
       }
       // other methods...

    }
     }

    class Car {

       private final Owner owner;
       private Park park;
       public Car(Owner o){
           this.owner = o;
       }

       public Owner getOwner(){
           return owner;
       }

       public Park getPark(){ return park}
       public void setPark(Park p){park = p}

and in the code you would have:

Owner o = new Owner("John Doe");
Car c = new Car(o);
Park p = new Park();
ParkingSpace ps = new ParkingSpace(1,2,3);
p.addParkSpace(ps);
car.setPark(p);
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Just to clarify - I am not adding and removing cars. There will always only be one car. What I am doing instead is adding parkingspaces to the garage. and removing parking spaces from the garage. Only relationship between the parking space and the car, is the fact that a car has a garage associated with it and the garage has parkingspaces which can be added and removed from the garage. I already have the car and the owner instantiated. How do I instantiate the garage and the parking spaces in terms of the car (to show that has-a relationship and call the methods on those) –  user1031551 Jul 2 '12 at 21:08
    
The lifecycle of your objects seem to be quite distinct. I would istantiate the ParkingSpace and the Park separately from the Car, and create the relationship with a setter only whn you need it. –  JayZee Jul 3 '12 at 6:14

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