Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This may be a stupid question but I have a code with the following line:

Solver *S, *STP = S = 
UseDummySolver ? createDummySolver() : new STPSolver(true);

I know the ternary operator but it's the equals signs that confuse me a bit. Can anyone give me some explanation ? Thanks.

share|improve this question
18  
That's a very ugly means of assigning two variables at once. (burn code[rs] like this with fire) –  user7116 Jul 2 '12 at 20:18
3  
There are many reasons for which this code plainly sucks. The double assignment part is just one of them. Not using RAII is another. –  Alexandre C. Jul 2 '12 at 20:19
    
Yes... I didn't even realize that is legal, and I've never seen that before! –  steveha Jul 2 '12 at 20:20
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Written out, it's

Solver *S;
Solver *STP;
S = UseDummySolver ? createDummySolver() : new STPSolver(true);
STP = S;

It's very ugly though, I'd not recommend doing that in your code.

The recommended way would be to write it as follows (use initialization, rather than assignment):

Solver *S = UseDummySolver ? createDummySolver() : new STPSolver(true);
Solver *STP = S;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Just beat me :) –  NominSim Jul 2 '12 at 20:20
2  
Why not use initialization, rather than assignment? –  Nawaz Jul 2 '12 at 20:25
    
@Nawaz He is just explaining to the the OP what the code actually does. –  NominSim Jul 2 '12 at 20:28
    
@Nawaz: I agree it's better. I just wanted to write it out as clearly as possible for the OP. –  houbysoft Jul 2 '12 at 20:28
1  
As @Nawaz says, it's not exactly the same, since you're assigning STP rather than initializing it as in the OP's code. –  Kerrek SB Jul 2 '12 at 20:50
show 1 more comment

I would recommend this:

Solver *S = UseDummySolver ? createDummySolver() : new STPSolver(true);
Solver *STP = S;

It is concise, yet neat and clean.

Also, it uses initialization, rather than assignment. You should prefer initialization over assignment wherever possible.

share|improve this answer
1  
Gave you a +1 for the recommendation for initialization vs assignment :) –  houbysoft Jul 2 '12 at 20:33
add comment

You're looking at chained assignment.

It is the same as:

Solver *S;
Solver *STP;
S = UseDummySolver ? createDummySolver() : new STPSolver(true);
STP = S;
share|improve this answer
    
@sixlettervariables Yeah fixed sorry, C++ not my forte. –  NominSim Jul 2 '12 at 20:23
    
Timing is everything :) +1 too –  houbysoft Jul 2 '12 at 20:23
1  
@sixlettervariables, NominSim, I edited the answer and put in the mistaken dereference. Sorry about that; the original code confused me. Not NominSim's fault at all. –  steveha Jul 2 '12 at 20:25
add comment

The ternary operator returns a value; based on the UseDummySolver Boolean value, it either returns a dummy solver or it returns a new instance of STPSolver(). This returned value is then stored in STP and S.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would prefer either this:

std::unique_ptr<Solver> S (  UseDummySolver
                                  ? createDummySolver()
                                  : new STPSolver(true)  );
Solver& STP = *S;

or this:

std::shared_ptr<Solver> S (  UseDummySolver
                                  ? createDummySolver()
                                  : new STPSolver(true)  );
std::shared_ptr<Solver> STP = S;

Both avoid one problem with the code you've got there: we don't need do decide which pointer to call delete on when the objects leave scope (or, in fact, remember the need to call delete at all). Instead, we just wait until the variables leave scope, then the Solver object is automatically removed. STP is in the first case umambiguously just another way of accessing the object while it's in scope, in the second case it's an independent "co-owner" of the of the object and both pointers can independently be re-assigned.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.