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I'm aware that I can use: isinstance(x, str) in python-3.x but I need to check if something is a string in python-2.x as well. Will isinstance(x, str) work as expected in python-2.x? Or will I need to check the version and use isinstance(x, basestr)?

Specifically, in python-2.x:

>>>isinstance(u"test", str)
False

and python-3.x does not have u"foo"

Thanks

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1  
u"" syntax for Unicode literals is reintroduced in Python 3.3 –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 2 '12 at 21:30
    
Exactly, this is an awkward problem to solve... thanks. –  ranman Jul 2 '12 at 21:41
    
@J.F.Sebastian, I read that, and LOL-ed. :-) Ah, those pesky strings... –  Prof. Falken May 27 '13 at 15:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 27 down vote accepted

If you're writing 2.x-and-3.x-compatible code, you'll probably want to use six:

from six import string_types
isinstance(s, string_types)
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This is @Lev Levitsky's answer, re-written a bit.

try:
    isinstance("", basestring)
    def isstr(s):
        return isinstance(s, basestring)
except NameError:
    def isstr(s):
        return isinstance(s, str)

The try/except test is done once, and then defines a function that always works and is as fast as possible.

EDIT: Actually, we don't even need to call isinstance(); we just need to evaluate basestring and see if we get a NameError:

try:
    basestring  # attempt to evaluate basestring
    def isstr(s):
        return isinstance(s, basestring)
except NameError:
    def isstr(s):
        return isinstance(s, str)

I think it is easier to follow with the call to isinstance(), though.

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isinstance("", basestring) is what I meant by "calling". Anyway, +1. –  Lev Levitsky Jul 2 '12 at 22:05
1  
Python is a very dynamic language, and I don't think it looks bad at all to have a test like that. This is a useful technique for figuring something out one time, and based on that, setting up a function that will always be correct. Thanks for the +1. –  steveha Jul 2 '12 at 22:16
2  
I'd write it as: try: string_types = basestring except NameError: string_types = str –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 4 '12 at 15:06

Maybe use a workaround like

def isstr(s):
    try:
        return isinstance(s, basestring)
    except NameError:
        return isinstance(s, str)
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to bug you but isinstance(u'hello', basestr) yields SyntaxError: invalid syntax for me with Python 3.2.3 under Window 7 .. any idea why this would be? It doesn't seem to like the u - I get this error with str and basestr –  Levon Jul 2 '12 at 21:22
    
@Levon No problem :) That's because Python3 doesn't have that syntax, as str in Python3 is by definition Unicode. Accordingly, there's no basestring type, hence the NameError that is caught in my snippet. –  Lev Levitsky Jul 2 '12 at 21:26
    
It does have that syntax as a noop now. in 3.3 –  ranman Jul 2 '12 at 21:29
    
Thanks LevLevitsky and @Ranman .. need to read up on this. –  Levon Jul 2 '12 at 21:30
2  
I would suggest doing the try/except test a single time, and based on the results of that single test, you define isstr() correctly. There is no need to incur the overhead of an exception for every call to isstr(). –  steveha Jul 2 '12 at 21:31

The most terse approach I've found without relying on packages like six, is:

try:
  basestring
except NameError:
  basestring = str

then, assuming you've been checking for strings in Python 2 in the most generic manner,

isinstance(s, basestring)

will now also work for Python 3+.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like this approach. –  ranman Mar 27 at 21:51

You can get the class of an object by calling object.__class__, so in order to check if object is the default string type:

    isinstance(object,"".__class__)

And You can place the following in the top of Your code so that strings enclosed by quotes are in unicode in python 2:

    from __future__ import unicode_literals
share|improve this answer
    
I this solution quite a bit. I found it can be useful to define str = "".__class__, which now allows isinstance(object, str) to be written normally, and also ensures that str(object) will return a unicode string in both Python 2 and Python 3. –  amicitas Dec 5 '13 at 14:10

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