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![result of auto Arima][1]

Hello,

I used auto ARIMA and have got a result like this:

Series: JMB 
ARIMA(5,1,4)(2,0,2)[96] with drift         

Coefficients:
         ar1     ar2      ar3     ar4      ar5      ma1      ma2     ma3      ma4
      1.3100  0.2710  -1.0215  0.5572  -0.1527  -0.8652  -0.6309  0.7686  -0.2520
s.e.  0.1384  0.1974   0.0752  0.1208   0.0334   0.1389   0.1371  0.0960   0.0797
        sar1    sar2     sma1     sma2   drift
      0.5959  0.4010  -0.4792  -0.4338  0.0005
s.e.  0.0382  0.0381   0.0388   0.0363  0.0183

sigma^2 estimated as 0.01521:  log likelihood=9835.91
AIC=-19636.59   AICc=-19636.56   BIC=-19522.77
> plot(forecast(fit,h=96), xlim=c(120,155) )
Warning message:
In sqrt(z[[2]] * object$sigma2) : NaNs produced and can not use plot (...) funktion.

In addition to the warning, the residual are also too big.

May be Auto Arima create a wrong model, and ![enter image description here][1]how can i improve this model?

share|improve this question
    
reproducible example??? tinyurl.com/reproducible-000 – Ben Bolker Jul 2 '12 at 21:23
    
I attempted to format this, but it was difficult to figure out what you meant to write. Please feel free to edit it further if I got anything wrong. – joran Jul 2 '12 at 21:25
    
Thank you for format. In order to improve this model and make useable, may be i should set up max.p=?, max.q=? ? – Igor Jul 2 '12 at 22:50

Seasonal ARIMA models do not work well when the seasonal period is large. You have a seasonal period of 96 which is way bigger than I would use for these types of models. See my blog post on this issue.

A few other minor points:

  • If you get a warning, that suggests there is a problem worth investigating. In this case, where are the NaNs coming from?
  • You say the residuals are "too big". On what grounds do you claim that? They are only too big if they contain structure that should have been modelled.
  • Please provide minimal reproducible examples when asking questions, and check the formatting before posting.
share|improve this answer
    
Hello Rob, I have seen your "my blog post", thanks for that. I just curious to know how do that in R "•for data with more than one sea­sonal period, you can include Fourier terms of dif­fer­ent frequencies"? I could do that only for one Season. I have read your article "Forecasting time series with complex seasonal patterns using exponential smoothing". May be could your provide "R" Code? I have a some issues with "R" realisation. I am using Data with a daily seasonal pattern ( about 80 points per day) and weekly seasonality ( 5 slightly different days and Weekend per week). Thank you – Igor Jul 7 '12 at 9:19
    
Hello Rob, I have seen your "my blog post", thanks for that. I just curious to know how do that in R "•for data with more than one sea­sonal period, you can include Fourier terms of dif­fer­ent frequencies"? I could do that only for one Season. I have read your article "Forecasting time series with complex seasonal patterns using exponential smoothing". May be could your provide "R" Code? I have a some issues with "R" realisation. I am using Data with a daily seasonal pattern about 80 points a day and weekly seasonality 5 slightly different days and diff. Weekend.Thank – Igor – Igor Jul 7 '12 at 10:41
    
Use the tbats() function in the forecast package. – Rob Hyndman Jul 9 '12 at 0:17

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