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How can I take ownership of std::string char data without copying and withoug keeping source std::string object ? (I want to use moving semantics but between different types)

I use c++11 clang compilar and boost.

Basically I want to something equivalent to this:

{
    std::string s(“possibly very long user string”); 
    const char* mine = s.c_str(); 

    // mine will be passed along, 
    pass(mine); 

    //made up call
    s.release_data();  

    // s should not release data but should properly destroy itself otherwise
}

To clarify I do need to get rid of std::string: further down the road the code deals with both string and binary data and should handle it in the same format. And I do want the data from std::string because that comes from another code layer that works with std::string.

To give more perspective where I run into wanting to do so: for example I have an async socket wrapper that should be able to take both std::string and binary data from user for writing. Both "API" write versions (taking std::string or row binary data) internally resolve to the same (binary) write. I need to avoid any copying as the string may be long.

WriteId     write( std::unique_ptr< std::string > strToWrite )
{

    // convert std::string data to contiguous byte storage
    // that will be further passed along to other 
    // functions (also with the moving semantics)
    // strToWrite.c_str() would be a solution to my problem 
    // if I could tell strToWrite to simply give up its
    // ownership. Is there a way? 

    unique_ptr<std::vector<char> > dataToWrite= ??

    //
    scheduleWrite( dataToWrite ); 


}

void scheduledWrite( std::unique_ptr< std::vecor<char> > data)
{
    …
}

std::unique_ptr in this example to illustrate ownership transfer: any other approach with the same semantics is fine to me.

I am wondering about solutions to this specific case (with std::string char buffer) and this sort of problem with strings, streams and similar general: tips to approach moving buffers around between string, stream, std containers and buffer types.

I would also appreciated tips and links with C++ design approaches and specific techniques when it comes to passing buffer data around between different API's/types without copying. I mention but not using streams because i'm shaky on that subject.

share|improve this question
1  
You can't, because there is no way you can reclaim the memory safely. At one point you ought to release the buffer, so why not keep the string all the way down, which does this automatically ? –  Alexandre C. Jul 2 '12 at 21:32
4  
std::unique_ptr<char[]> would be the only thing that allows anything similar. –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 21:33
2  
@minsk : I think everyone is clear on your scenario, but you're not getting it -- it isn't possible. ;-] –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 22:23
1  
Also, you are aware that std::string stores binary data (including embedded nulls) just fine, right? Are you sure you can't just continue using std::string? –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 22:32
1  
@minsk : Er, with size() or length() -- neither of those care about embedded nulls (and use cppreference rather than cplusplus.com if you want reliable information :-]). –  ildjarn Jul 3 '12 at 0:04

3 Answers 3

How can I take ownership of std::string char data without copying and withoug keeping source std::string object ? (I want to use moving semantics but between different types)

You cannot do this safely.

For a specific implementation, and in some circumstances, you could do something awful like use aliasing to modify private member variables inside the string to trick the string into thinking it no longer owns a buffer. But even if you're willing to try this it won't always work. E.g. consider the small string optimization where a string does not have a pointer to some external buffer holding the data, the data is inside the string object itself.


If you want to avoid copying you could consider changing the interface to scheduledWrite. One possibility is something like:

template<typename Container>
void scheduledWrite(Container data)
{
    // requires data[i], data.size(), and &data[n] == &data[0] + n for n [0,size)
    …
}

// move resources from object owned by a unique_ptr
WriteId write( std::unique_ptr< std::vector<char> > vecToWrite)
{
    scheduleWrite(std::move(*vecToWrite));
}

WriteId write( std::unique_ptr< std::string > strToWrite)
{
    scheduleWrite(std::move(*strToWrite));
}

// move resources from object passed by value (callers also have to take care to avoid copies)
WriteId write(std::string strToWrite)
{
    scheduleWrite(std::move(strToWrite));
}

// assume ownership of raw pointer
// requires data to have been allocated with new char[]
WriteId write(char const *data,size_t size) // you could also accept an allocator or deallocation function and make ptr_adapter deal with it
{
    struct ptr_adapter {
        std::unique_ptr<char const []> ptr;
        size_t m_size;
        char const &operator[] (size_t i) { return ptr[i]; }
        size_t size() { return m_size; }
    };

    scheduleWrite(ptr_adapter{data,size});
}
share|improve this answer
1  
@minsk: It's quite reasonable to want that, unfortunately it's just not possible, because the class isn't designed to allow it. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 2 '12 at 21:34
    
@minsk: You don't know how the buffer is supposed to be released. Since there is no release member, you can't achieve what you want with string. –  Alexandre C. Jul 2 '12 at 21:41
    
Those are good points: small string optimization and knowing how to release another implementation buffer. What about std::stringstream, can I move std::string into std::stringstream which exposes its buffers? Those are both std objects, and std::stringstream is aware of std::string.. I would really want to find a solution which avoids copying and allows part of the code to work with strings :( –  minsk Jul 2 '12 at 22:00
    
@Alexandre: I dont want to keep std::string all the way because i want to internally unify implementation for string or binary data. Otherwise i have to keep track of two version. –  minsk Jul 2 '12 at 22:05
    
@minsk : "What about std::stringstream, can i move std::string into std stream somehow?" Nope, std::basic_stringbuf<> takes its string argument by const-reference. –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 22:09

This class take ownership of a string using move semantics and shared_ptr:

struct charbuffer
{
  charbuffer()
  {}

  charbuffer(size_t n, char c)
  : _data(std::make_shared<std::string>(n, c))
  {}

  explicit charbuffer(std::string&& str)
  : _data(std::make_shared<std::string>(str))
  {}

  charbuffer(const charbuffer& other)
  : _data(other._data)
  {}

  charbuffer(charbuffer&& other)
  {
    swap(other);
  }

  charbuffer& operator=(charbuffer other)
  {
    swap(other);
    return *this;
  }

  void swap(charbuffer& other)
  {
    using std::swap;
    swap(_data, other._data);
  }

  char& operator[](int i)
  { 
    return (*_data)[i];
  } 

  char operator[](int i) const
  { 
    return (*_data)[i];
  } 

  size_t size() const
  {
    return _data->size();
  }

  bool valid() const
  { 
    return _data;
  }

private:
  std::shared_ptr<std::string> _data;

};

Example usage:

std::string s("possibly very long user string");

charbuffer cb(std::move(s)); // s is empty now

// use charbuffer...
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I understand the charbuffer that is moved will then hold an empty shared_ptr (the same that is default constructed in the copy-move constructor) so when the moved charbuffer go out of scope and its destructor its called then nothing happen. –  Gigi Jul 2 '12 at 22:45
    
You're 100% right, not sure what I was thinking now. :-P Sorry for the noise. –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 22:49
    
No problem at all :) –  Gigi Jul 2 '12 at 22:51

You could use polymorphism to resolve this. The base type is the interface to your unified data buffer implementation. Then you would have two derived classes. One for std::string as the source, and the other uses your own data representation.

struct MyData {
    virtual void * data () = 0;
    virtual const void * data () const = 0;
    virtual unsigned len () const = 0;
    virtual ~MyData () {}
};

struct MyStringData : public MyData {
    std::string data_src_;
    //...
};

struct MyBufferData : public MyData {
    MyBuffer data_src_;
    //...
};
share|improve this answer
    
user315052 I marked this answer up because it is a solution and thx for answering. But I would avoid this approach for a number of reasons including possible virtual inheritance hit, type safety, management issues; it imposes a data type (MyData) further down the road. May become very cumbersome. I'll have to have some sort of unique access around data_src_, on top of it i'll have to new MyData and wrap that (to pass it around including to other threads). If I have to go with a wrapper, I'd rather use less intrusive & safer approach without virtual, suggested in 1st answer by bames53 –  minsk Jul 3 '12 at 0:32

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