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We're trying to use BeautifulSoup through Django to do some text extraction. We've got an odd bug that we've traced down to the following that we don't understand.

If we issue the following in a standard Python prompt:

import re
print re.match("&#([0-9]+)[^0-9]","»")

We get an output of None, as should be expected. However, when we put this code in sgmllib.py (which Django eventually calls through a long string of calls via our website), Python does successfully match this, and returns an object. It's appearing to us as though Django is somehow ignoring the x in the above string. I assume this has got to be related to unicode settings, and so on, but we can't seem to figure out why Django is running differently as opposed to when we run this code ourselves in a vanilla Python 2.6 session.

Why should the regular expression above not match when run normally, but does match, when Django tries it?

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1  
Your data looks like...? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 2 '12 at 21:43
    
try to add your original code here instead of an example... Maybe the error is in another line of code and we are missing it... It will be helpful for example if you can tell us where this "»" value comes from.... – marianobianchi Jul 3 '12 at 2:41

The 'x' is part of the string you are testing. If you don't account for it in your regular expression then it won't match. Python is working correctly. I would be surprised if Django behaves differently, but maybe there is a bug somewhere else. If adding the 'x' gives you problems in Django, you can try this:

>>> rc = re.match("&#[xX]?([0-9]+)","»")
>>> rc.group(1)
'00'
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