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I'm using the Q module for Node.js in attempts to avoid the "pyramid of doom" in scenarios where I have many steps. For example:

function doTask(task, callback)
{
    Q.ncall(task.step1, task)
    .then(function(result1){
        return Q.ncall(task.step2, task);
    })
    .then(function(result2){
        return Q.ncall(task.step3, task);
    })
    .fail(callback).end();
}

Essentially this seems to work; if an error is thrown by any of the task steps, it is passed to the callback (though I would be welcome to improvements, as I am new to node.js promises). However, I have a problem when I need to abort the task-chain early. For example, if result1 is successfully returned I might want to call the callback early and abort the rest, but my attempts to do so are failing...

function doTask(task, callback)
{
    Q.ncall(task.step1, task)
    .then(function(result1){
        if(result1)
        {// the rest of the task chain is unnecessary 
            console.log('aborting!');
            callback(null, result1);
            return null;
        }
        return Q.ncall(task.step2, task);
    })
    .then(function(result2){
        console.log('doing step 3...');
        return Q.ncall(task.step3, task);
    })
    .fail(callback).end();
}

In this example, I see both "aborting!" and "doing step 3..." printed.

I'm sure I'm merely misunderstanding some basic principles here, so would appreciate any help. Thanks!

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One solution I found is to create a separate promise chain after the first chain might break. Than is, in the above example, the .then statement with result2 becomes attached to the Q.ncall for step2, instead of being attached to the original promise. HOWEVER, the major downside here is that it gets rid of one of the major benefits for Q in my opinion: avoiding the pyramid of doom! It is still better than no promises at all, but I don't like the solution... –  Zane Claes Jul 3 '12 at 13:30
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2 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Any errors that are thrown within the promise chain will cause the entire stack to be aborted early and control is given to the error-back path. (in this case, the fail() handler) When you detect a certain state which causes you to want to abort the promise chain, then just throw a very specific error, which you trap in the error-back and ignore (if you so choose)

function doTask(task, callback)
{
    Q.ncall(task.step1, task)
    .then(function(result1){
        if(result1 == 'some failure state I want to cause abortion')
        {// the rest of the task chain is unnecessary 
            console.log('aborting!');
            throw new Error('abort promise chain');
            return null;
        }
        return Q.ncall(task.step2, task);
    })
    .then(function(result2){
        console.log('doing step 3...');
        return Q.ncall(task.step3, task);
    })
    .fail(function(err) {
        if (err.message === 'abort promise chain') {
            // just swallow error because chain was intentionally aborted
        }
        else {
            // else let the error bubble up because it's coming from somewhere else
            throw err;
        } 
    })
    .end();
}
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4  
You're using exceptions for control flow, and this is not usually recommended. The solution given by Kris Kowal avoids that problem. –  Gorgi Kosev Oct 9 '13 at 0:48
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This is a case where you will need to branch, which does mean either nesting or creating a subroutine.

function doTask(task, callback) {
    return Q.ncall(task.step1, task)
    .then(function(result1) {
        if (result1) return result1;
        return Q.ncall(task.step2, task)
        .then(function(result2) {
            return Q.ncall(task.step3, task);
        })
    })
    .nodeify(callback)
}

Or

function doTask(task, callback) {
    return Q.ncall(task.step1, task)
    .then(function(result1) {
        if (result1) {
            return result1;
        } else {
            return continueTasks(task);
        }
    })
    .nodeify(callback)
}

function continueTasks(task) {
    return Q.ncall(task.step2, task)
    .then(function(result2) {
        return Q.ncall(task.step3, task);
    })
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is this the best approach for branching? It seems this introduces indentation again when there are multiple branches. Here's an example where I perform multiple file operations using q-io. I first check if a dir exists, list the files looking for a certain file, and delete it if just one matching file is found. There are multiple if-conditions in there that should abort the chain. I use a special return value to check for that case but have to check it in every function. Is this a good approach? –  Sven Jacobs May 16 at 15:38
1  
@SvenJacobs what you’re describing in that example is a good case for exceptions. Consider gist.github.com/kriskowal/e98774443eb0f1653871 –  Kris Kowal May 24 at 15:12
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