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I'm making a Text Adventure game in Groovy as a sort of exercise, and I'm running into a strange error.

Right now, I have an enum for the directions that a player will be able to go, currently containing North, South, East, West, Up, and Down.

I have a Room class that holds a Map of other connected rooms and their directions. When I add a Room to another Room at a certain Direction, I want to be able to also add the current Room to the other Room at the opposite direction.

Ex: If I add a connection from Room 1 to Room 2 going north, I want to be able to add a connection from Room 2 to Room 1 going south at the same time.

Currently, I am trying to implement this using an enum named Direction with an attached instance variable opposite (of type Direction). Is this not allowed? I'm not getting compiler errors or anything, but I can't seem to get it to work.

Here's the full enum declaration:

public enum Direction {
    North(South), South(North), East(West), West(East), Up(Down), Down(Up)
    private Direction opposite
    Direction(Direction d){
        opposite = d
    }
    public opposite(){
        return opposite
    }
}

And this is the method that I am calling it from:

public void addConnection(Direction d, Spot spot){
    connections[d] = spot
    spot.connections[d.opposite()] = this
}

where connections is a public Map<Direction, Spot>.

In this case, an entry gets added to connections that looks like this:

null:Spot@some_hexadecimal_representation

Any help would be great. Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Groovy seems to circumvent what in Java is a compilation error:

Main.java:2: illegal forward reference
    North(South), South(North), East(West), West(East), Up(Down), Down(Up);
          ^
Main.java:2: illegal forward reference
    North(South), South(North), East(West), West(East), Up(Down), Down(Up);
                                     ^
Main.java:2: illegal forward reference
    North(South), South(North), East(West), West(East), Up(Down), Down(Up);
                                                           ^
3 errors

The groovy compiler does not complain about that, but initializes the enum values that need forward declarations as null:

public enum Direction {
    North(South), South(North), East(West), West(East), Up(Down), Down(Up)
    Direction(Direction d){
        println "opposite of $this is $d"
    }
}

Direction.South // Force enum instantiation in GroovyConsole.

Outputs:

opposite of North is null
opposite of South is North
opposite of East is null
opposite of West is East
opposite of Up is null
opposite of Down is Up

One solution that seems to work just fine in Java is adding a static block on the Direction class to initialize the opposite values. Translated to Groovy, that would be:

enum Direction {
    North, South, East, West, Up, Down
    private Direction opposite
    Direction getOpposite() { opposite }

    static {
        def opposites = { d1, d2 -> d1.opposite = d2; d2.opposite = d1 }
        opposites(North, South)
        opposites(East, West)
        opposites(Up, Down)
    }
}

Direction.values().each { 
    println "opposite of $it is $it.opposite"
}

Which now prints the correct values:

opposite of North is South
opposite of South is North
opposite of East is West
opposite of West is East
opposite of Up is Down
opposite of Down is Up

Update

Another, maybe more straightforward, solution can using the direction indexes on the enum to find the opposites:

public enum Direction {
    North(1), South(0), East(3), West(2), Up(5), Down(4)
    private oppositeIndex
    Direction getOpposite() { 
        values()[oppositeIndex]
    }
    Direction(oppositeIndex) { 
        this.oppositeIndex = oppositeIndex
    }
}

But i find the first one clearer as it doesn't need those magic numbers for the indexes hehe.

Update 2

Now, i'm probably getting a bit into golfing lands here, but you can get the opposite direction without the need of an extra field, just using the enum values' ordinal() (their index):

enum Direction {
    North, South, East, West, Up, Down
    Direction getOpposite() { 
        values()[ordinal() + ordinal() % 2 * -2 + 1]
    }
}

It's not as scary as it looks! Even directions (North, East, Up) return the direction at ordinal() + 1 as their opposite, while odd directions (the other ones) return the ones at ordinal() - 1. Of course it is heavily relying on the order of the elements in the enum, but, don't you love the succinctness? =D

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Great solution! This compiles and runs smoothly on my machine, and is very readable. Thank you. –  Benjamin Kovach Jul 3 '12 at 0:04
1  
@BenjaminKovach If you don't want so much readability (or you want to leave a little riddle for future maintainers of the code), take a look at my second update on the answer xD –  epidemian Jul 3 '12 at 0:33
1  
+1 Nice solution! You can also replace the getOpposite method with @Lazy opposite = { values()[ordinal() + ordinal() % 2 * -2 + 1] }() if you only want to calculate the opposites once (though in this case, it's overkill) ;-) –  tim_yates Jul 3 '12 at 8:13
    
@tim_yates as it turns out, you don't even need the closure! @Lazy opposite = values()[ordinal() + ordinal() % 2 * -2 + 1] works just fine! –  Benjamin Kovach Jul 3 '12 at 16:09

It looks like half of the Directions are not initialized when the enum constructor is called. That is, when you call North(South), South hasn't been initialized. It's next in line.

You're caught in a chicken/egg paradox where all of the enum constants must be initialized before one of them can be. It seems like you will need to reorganize some of your code to account for this. I might suggest:

public enum Direction {
    North(1), South(~1), East(2), West(~2), Up(4), Down(~4);

    private int value;

    Direction(int d){
        value = d;
    }

    private int getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public Direction opposite(){
        for (Direction d : Direction.values()) {
            if (value == ~(d.getValue())) 
                return d;
        }
        return null;
    }
}

This utilizes the bitwise operator ~ to distinguish opposites.

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Ahh, that makes sense. A direct copy/paste of this code gives me a java.lang.ExceptionInInitializerError when I try to iterate over Directions, though. I'm not too keen on what this means. Any ideas? –  Benjamin Kovach Jul 2 '12 at 23:37
    
@Benjamin It means pretty much exactly what it says. Can you put a try/catch block around the offending line and catch the Error, then call getException() on the error? That should give you a little more information about what exactly went wrong. –  gobernador Jul 2 '12 at 23:40
    
@Benjamin I fixed the problem, it was a mistake on my part. I don't know if this answer is still helpful, but the code has been corrected. –  gobernador Jul 5 '12 at 14:18

You could defer evaluation of the opposite by passing it in a closure and calling the closure when you want the opposite:

public enum Direction {
    North({South}), South({North}), East({West}), West({East}), Up({Down}), Down({Up})
    private def opp
    Direction(opp) {
        this.opp = opp
    }
    public opposite() {
        return opp()
    }
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
    Direction.each { d ->
        println "${d} ... ${d.opposite()}"
    }
}

Outputs:

North ... South
South ... North
East ... West
West ... East
Up ... Down
Down ... Up
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