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Given I have code like the following, what do I need to do to make it work?

config = {} #options for faster csv
input_file = "foo.csv"

# can be in any class or module
def count_item_groups(items)
    results = Hash.new(0)
    (items || []).each do |current|
        results[current.to_s] += 1
    end
    results
end

row_value_iterator = FasterCSV.foreach(input_file, config) do |row|
  yield return row[1]
end

result = count_item_groups(row_value_iterator)

Versus code like this

def do_it_all
    results = Hash.new(0)
    FasterCSV.foreach(input_file, config) do |row|
        results[row[1].to_s] += 1
    end
    results
end

Result should be a hash with keys of the row[1] values. yield return doesn't exist in Ruby, but I'm sure that Ruby can handle this type of code.

share|improve this question
    
What is the yield return row[1] supposed to do? and what is the c# tag for? –  oldergod Jul 3 '12 at 0:24
    
yes. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9k7k7cf0.aspx I want to stream the row values, 1 by 1, out of the created iterator (row_value_iterator) into the count_item_groups method. –  Jason Jul 3 '12 at 0:30
    
count_item_groups is just going to call .each on the collection. I want to do this to separate the code that knows what column in the CSV file to pull out from the code that will do the grouping. –  Jason Jul 3 '12 at 0:32
    
Why are you linking to the C# documentation on that language's yield statement in a question about ruby? –  Pete Jul 3 '12 at 1:08
    
@Pete because I'm looking to learn how to use the C# idiom in a Ruby manor. Hopefully learning the Ruby way of doing a similar task. –  Jason Jul 3 '12 at 4:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's what I understand you are asking: "How can I transform a method like FasterCSV.foreach that works imperatively (by doing side-effects) to something functional (that yields values) so I can modularize my code".

Answer: In Ruby you can transform a each method to an Enumerator object with Object#enum_for. Now you could use your count_item_groups with the output of the map, but I'd suggest to use Facets' Enumerable#frequency:

results = FasterCSV.enum_for(:foreach, "file.csv", {}).map do |row|
  row[1].to_s
end.frequency
#=> {"val1"=>3, "val2"=>1}
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure what you're asking, I assumed that is related to chainable feature.

Instead of passing the object iterator to another iterator as parameter, in ruby you can chain these iterators. It mignt look like this.

row_value_iterator = FasterCSV.foreach(input_file, config).map do |row|
  row[1]
end

result = row_value_iterator.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) do |current,results|
  results[current.to_s] += 1
end

Or do it in truly chain style:

result = FasterCSV.foreach(input_file,config).each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) do |row,results|
  results[row[1].to_s] += 1
end
share|improve this answer
    
I think what the OP wants is be able to separate the CSV-reading from the occurrences-counting (which is a sound thing to do). –  tokland Jul 3 '12 at 13:52

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