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Yesterday I installed clang 3.1 and g++ 4.7 and tried compiling a project I'm working on. I was surprised to see that it didn't compile using both of the compilers. But what surprises me most is that the problem is in boost::shared_ptr.

Apparently, since that class defines a move constructor/assignment operator, the copy constructor is implicitly deleted. So this code:

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

int main() {
    boost::shared_ptr<int> x;
    boost::shared_ptr<int> y(x);
}

Does not compile. clang echoes this error:

test.cpp:5:28: error: call to implicitly-deleted copy constructor of
      'boost::shared_ptr<int>'
    boost::shared_ptr<int> y(x);
                           ^ ~
/usr/include/boost/smart_ptr/shared_ptr.hpp:347:5: note: copy constructor is
      implicitly deleted because 'shared_ptr<int>' has a user-declared move
      constructor
    shared_ptr( shared_ptr && r ): px( r.px ), pn() // never throws
    ^

g++ 4.7 provides a similar error, referring to the implicitly deleted constructor as well. The weird thing is that boost::shared_ptr, actually explicitly defines a copy constructor(boost/smart_ptr/shared_ptr.hpp line 228):

    template<class Y>
#if !defined( BOOST_SP_NO_SP_CONVERTIBLE )

    shared_ptr( shared_ptr<Y> const & r, typename boost::detail::sp_enable_if_convertible<Y,T>::type = boost::detail::sp_empty() )

#else

    shared_ptr( shared_ptr<Y> const & r )

#endif
    : px( r.px ), pn( r.pn ) // never throws
    {
    }

I'm using boost 1.48.0.2, which is fairly new. Does anyone know what is going on in here? Why is the copy constructor not being detected when it's actually defined? Is this fixed in newer versions of the smart pointer library? I couldn't find anything on changelogs.

share|improve this question
5  
Boost 1.48 is not new, it's 8 months old (1.50 is current), and since it was released, many C++11-related bugfixes were made. I would say that step 1 is verifying that this works in a newer version of Boost (or just use std::shared_ptr instead). –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 23:57
    
@Gigi same problem. ildjarn Yes, 8 months old is fairly new to me. The thing is I don't understand why the hell it isn't working, since the copy constructor is actually defined. I'm probably going to have to update my boost libraries, anyway. –  mfontanini Jul 3 '12 at 0:01
1  
@mfontanini : 8 months old is pretty old in Boost terms, especially in terms of bleeding-edge compiler support. :-] –  ildjarn Jul 3 '12 at 0:01
1  
Well, I've updated boost and it's working now :D –  mfontanini Jul 3 '12 at 0:52
3  
@mfontanini - The constructor you show is not a copy constructor, because it is a template. It is a converting constuctor from other types. –  Bo Persson Jul 3 '12 at 6:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a known bug in Boost. The older versions (1.48 and lower) of Boost are not compilable under C++11, at least, not all. Personally, I use this workaround:

#ifdef MY_LIB_COMPILING_UNDER_CXX11

#include <memory>

namespace my_lib {

using std::shared_ptr;
using std::weak_ptr;

};

#else

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/weak_ptr.hpp>

namespace my_lib {

using boost::shared_ptr;
using boost::weak_ptr;

};

#endif

Where MY_LIB_COMPILING_UNDER_CXX11 would be a flag that you set either passed to the compiler or deriving it from the compiler's C++11 flags. And, then, in the rest of the library I only use my_lib::shared_ptr. This works very well.

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that I'm not using boost::shared_ptr, but boost::asio is. So I'm unable to do that. Anyway, +1 for pointing out that it's a known bug. I'll probably do is ildjarn says and update my boost libraries. –  mfontanini Jul 3 '12 at 0:08
1  
I checked, and apparently it is fixed as of version 1.48.0. But it doesn't say which revision, so I must assume that it is fixed from version 1.48.0.3 (since you tested with 1.48.0.2 and it failed, and the 1.48.0.3 is the last minor revision within 1.48.0). –  Mikael Persson Jul 3 '12 at 0:39
    
Thanks for checking that out! I've updated to the latest version and it works fine now. –  mfontanini Jul 3 '12 at 1:04

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