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I'm working on a somewhat large-scale JS application and I want to break out some common functions into a utility class. I'm not quite clear on how I should go about it, however.

For example, say I have a bunch of shape-based classes that need to call a function in the utility class:

// Triangle class
Triangle.prototype = new Shape();
Triangle.prototype.constructor = Triangle;

function Triangle() {...}
Triangle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
  var outline = Utility.canvas.trace(this._canvas); // Trace the shape.
  this._viewport.drawImage(outline, 0, 0); // Draw the traced outline.
}

// Circle class
Circle.prototype = new Shape();
Circle.prototype.constructor = Circle;

function Circle() {...}
Circle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
  var outline = Utility.canvas.trace(this._canvas); // Trace the shape.
  this._viewport.drawImage(outline, 0, 0); // Draw the traced outline.
}

Does it make sense to instantiate the Utility class at the global level? I feel like there should be an additional level above it, something like Application so I'd have Application.Utility, Application.UI, and so on. Unfortunately, going this route forces each specialized shape class to know what the greater program structure is (so it can reference Application.Utility), which isn't very good.

Is there a better, preferred manner to have specialized JS classes make use of generalized class functions that aren't inherited?


Edit: It might help to say that I'm trying to relate this to an #include or import statement from C++ or Java. What's the best way to go about this in JS?

share|improve this question
1  
There's no native import for javascript. You can write one relatively easily if you're keen. The usual go is to check the existence of an object, if it exists, move on, otherwise load script x/y.js synchronously. You'd want to be working with a fairly big js library to make this worth the effort. – Peter Wilkinson Jul 3 '12 at 0:30
    
See my edit for your edit :) – elclanrs Jul 3 '12 at 0:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that you're wrapping all your code in an anonymous function then what I usually do is just create an object (namespace) and put all the utils there:

;(function(){

  var Utils = {
    triangle: function () { ... },
    circle: function () { ... }
  }

}())

Then whenever you use it you just do Utils.circle(...) that way you know when you're using utils and it's easy to keep track of them, add new ones, etc.

It might help to say that I'm trying to relate this to an #include or import statement from C++ or Java. What's the best way to go about this in JS?

In this case the simplest way is to create a concat.sh file or similar and a start.js and end.js and add everything in between.

start.js

;(function(){

utils.js

var Utils = {
  triangle: function () { ... },
  circle: function () { ... }
}

end.js

}())

concat.sh

Order is important, of course.

#!bin/bash
cat start.js utils.js end.js > out.js

If you're into node.js check out grunt that does all of this for you with little configuration.

Otherwise, for more advanced stuff use CommonJS modules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanations and examples. I'm not so concerned with actually emulating the functionality of importing JS code, but rather the concept of being able to gain access to methods outside the implementation of a specific class. Namespacing at a semi-global level inside an anonymous function seems pretty clean and definitely achieves what I'd like. – Xenethyl Jul 3 '12 at 0:38
1  
Why the initial emtpy statement? Seems like voodoo to me. – RobG Jul 3 '12 at 2:39
    
If you write JS leveraging ASI, then it's good to add ; before expressions, if not necessary in most cases. – elclanrs Jul 3 '12 at 2:44

The biggest reason for namespacing stuff is to avoid collisions between libraries. Personally I prefix everything I write with dt. So I'd have dt.Utility. Pick a prefix and go with it. =)

share|improve this answer
    
I may do this in the future. I'm hesitant to "specialize" the utility class inside a personal namespace as I may or may not use it in other projects. I was more concerned with the concept of breaking the class out and instantiating it in a rather high scope level. You confirmed for me that this is what we have to work with in JS, though, so thanks! – Xenethyl Jul 3 '12 at 0:44

The problem might actually be that the utility class, shouldn't be an utility class really. Maybe it's best to do something like this:

// Triangle class
Triangle.prototype = new Shape();
Triangle.prototype.constructor = Triangle;

function Triangle() {...}
Triangle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
}

// Circle class
Circle.prototype = new Shape();
Circle.prototype.constructor = Circle;

function Circle() {...}
Circle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
}

function OutlineDrawer(shape)
{
    this.shape = shape;
}

OutlineDrawer.prototype.draw(viewport)
{
    var outline = Utility.canvas.traceShape(this.shape.canvas()); // Trace the shape.
    viewport.drawImage(outline, 0, 0); // Draw the traced outline.
}

You are putting to much responsibility on the shapes. The shapes should define the properties of that specific instance of the shape, but you should probably use a different class to trace them. You might want to draw the same shape into different view ports (for saving it to a file for example), or use different algorithms to draw the same scene (to adjust speed vs performance vs quality). etc...

share|improve this answer
    
I understand where you're coming from, and in my hypothetical example here it probably makes sense to have a more "rendering-specific" class to take care of drawing functions. I general, though, I was concerned about utility functions that would be useful across multiple classes. – Xenethyl Jul 3 '12 at 0:47

Same answer as others.

Put your prototypes inside a global object ( I know, its not very recommended, but its a special case ).


// Utils.js

// treat this global object as a "namespace" or "module"
var Utils = 
{

  // Triangle class
  Triangle.prototype = new Shape();
  Triangle.prototype.constructor = Triangle;

  function Triangle() {...}
    Triangle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
    var outline = Utility.canvas.traceShape(this._canvas); // Trace the shape.
    this._viewport.drawImage(outline, 0, 0); // Draw the traced outline.
  }

  // Circle class
  Circle.prototype = new Shape();
  Circle.prototype.constructor = Circle;

  function Circle() {...}
    Circle.prototype.drawOutline = function() {
    var outline = Utility.canvas.traceShape(this._canvas); // Trace the shape.
    this._viewport.drawImage(outline, 0, 0); // Draw the traced outline.
  }
} // var Utils

// anotherfile.js

var MyTriangle = new Utils.Triangle();
var MyCircle  =  new Utils.Triangle();

This trick, its called the "Module Software Design Pattern".

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