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I have a non-linear optimization problem with constraints. It can be solved in Microsoft Excel with the Solver add-in, but I am having trouble replicating that in C#.

My problem is shown in the following spreadsheet. I am solving the classic A x = b problem but with the caveat that all components of x must be non-negative. So instead of using standard linear algebra I use Solver with the non-negative constraint, minimizing the sum of the squared differences, and get a reasonable solution. I have tried to replicate this in C# using either Microsoft Solver Foundation or Solver SDK. However I can't seem to get anywhere with them because with MSF I can't figure out how to define the goal and with Solver SDK I always get back status "optimal" and a solution of all 0s which is definitely not even a local minimum.

Here is my code for Solver SDK:

static double[][] A = new double[][] { new double[] { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0 }, new double[] { 0.760652602, 1, 0, 0, 0 }, new double[] { 0.373419404, 0.760537565, 1, 0, 0 }, new double[] { 0.136996731, 0.373331934, 0.760422587, 1, 0 }, new double[] { 0.040625222, 0.136953801, 0.373244464, 0.76030755, 1 } };
static double[][] b = new double[][] { new double[] { 2017159 }, new double[] { 1609660 }, new double[] { 837732.8125 }, new double[] { 330977.3125 }, new double[] { 87528.38281 } };

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    using(Problem problem = new Problem(Solver_Type.Minimize, 5, 0))
    {
        problem.VarDecision.LowerBound.Array = new double[] { 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };
        problem.VarDecision.UpperBound.Array = new double[] { Constants.PINF, Constants.PINF, Constants.PINF, Constants.PINF, Constants.PINF };

        problem.Evaluators[Eval_Type.Function].OnEvaluate += new EvaluateEventHandler(SumOfSquaredErrors);

        problem.ProblemType = Problem_Type.OptNLP;

        problem.Solver.Optimize();

        Optimize_Status status = problem.Solver.OptimizeStatus;

        Console.WriteLine(status.ToString());
        foreach(double x in problem.VarDecision.FinalValue.Array)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(x);
        }
    }
}

static Engine_Action SumOfSquaredErrors(Evaluator evaluator)
{
    double[][] x = new double[evaluator.Problem.Variables[0].Value.Array.Length][];
    for(int i = 0; i < x.Length; i++)
    {
        x[i] = new double[1] { evaluator.Problem.Variables[0].Value.Array[i] };
    }

    double[][] b_calculated = MatrixMultiply(A, x);

    double sum_sq = 0.0;
    for(int i = 0; i < b_calculated.Length; i++)
    {
        sum_sq += Math.Pow(b_calculated[i][0] - b[i][0], 2);
    }
    evaluator.Problem.FcnObjective.Value[0] = sum_sq;

    return Engine_Action.Continue;
}

static double[][] MatrixMultiply(double[][] left, double[][] right)
{
    if(left[0].Length != right.Length)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException();
    }

    double[][] sum = new double[left.Length][];
    for(int i = sum.GetLowerBound(0); i <= sum.GetUpperBound(0); i++)
    {
        sum[i] = new double[right[i].Length];
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < sum.Length; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < sum[0].Length; j++)
        {
            for(int k = 0; k < right.Length; k++)
            {
                sum[i][j] += left[i][k] * right[k][j];
            }
        }
    }

    return sum;
}

I don't have any code for Microsoft Solver Foundation because I don't think the goal function can be written in a single line and it doesn't allow for delegates like Solver SDK does.

share|improve this question
    
So how about showing us your code? If you get back all 0's then you're probably doing something wrong. – Ed S. Jul 3 '12 at 3:57
    
There you go. Would have done it before but I had to write a quick-and-dirty matrix multiplication function since I am using a proprietary Matrix class. – Craig W Jul 3 '12 at 16:12
    
would like to see Microsoft solver foundation code – FistOfFury Sep 17 '12 at 19:03
1  
@FistOfFury See the accepted answer below. – Craig W Sep 17 '12 at 21:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One alternative would be to formulate this as an LP problem:

minimize sum of the elements in x

subject to Ax >= b

This should be fairly simple to formulate using Solver Foundation, based on one of the LP samples.

UPDATE JULY 5

The above approach also looks overly complex, but maybe this is due to the Frontline Solver API. Using Microsoft Solver Foundation, and minimizing the sum of squared differences, the following program:

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var solver = SolverContext.GetContext();
    var model = solver.CreateModel();

    var A = new[,]
        {
            { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0 }, 
            { 0.760652602, 1, 0, 0, 0 }, 
            { 0.373419404, 0.760537565, 1, 0, 0 },
            { 0.136996731, 0.373331934, 0.760422587, 1, 0 },
            { 0.040625222, 0.136953801, 0.373244464, 0.76030755, 1 }
        };
    var b = new[] { 2017159, 1609660, 837732.8125, 330977.3125, 87528.38281 };

    var n = A.GetLength(1);
    var x = new Decision[n];
    for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        model.AddDecision(x[i] = new Decision(Domain.RealNonnegative, null));

    // START NLP SECTION
    var m = A.GetLength(0);
    Term goal = 0.0;
    for (var j = 0; j < m; ++j)
    {
        Term Ax = 0.0;
        for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i) Ax += A[j, i] * x[i];
        goal += Model.Power(Ax - b[j], 2.0);
    }
    model.AddGoal(null, GoalKind.Minimize, goal);
    // END NLP SECTION

    var solution = solver.Solve();
    Console.WriteLine("f = {0}", solution.Goals.First().ToDouble());
    for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i) Console.WriteLine("x[{0}] = {1}", i, x[i].GetDouble());
}

generates the following solution, which should be in line with the solution from the linked Excel sheet:

f = 254184688.179922
x[0] = 2017027.31820845
x[1] = 76226.6063397686
x[2] = 26007.3375581303
x[3] = 1.00650383558278E-07
x[4] = 4.18546775823669E-09

If I am not mistaken, unlike GRG, Solver Foundation cannot support general non-linear constraints out-of-the-box, I believe you will need additional plug-ins to handle these. For your problem, this is of course not an issue.

For completeness, to formulate the LP problem instead, exchange the code between START NLP SECTION and END NLP SECTION with the following code:

    var m = A.GetLength(0);
    var constraints = new Term[m];
    for (var j = 0; j < m; ++j)
    {
        Term Ax = 0.0;
        for (var i = 0; i < n; ++i) Ax += A[j, i] * x[i];
        model.AddConstraint(null, constraints[j] = Model.GreaterEqual(Ax, b[j]));
    }
    model.AddGoal(null, GoalKind.Minimize, Model.Sum(x));

which will yield the following output (note that objective functions are different in the two cases, hence the large differences in f):

f = 2125502.27815564
x[0] = 2017159
x[1] = 75302.7580022821
x[2] = 27215.9247379241
x[3] = 5824.5954154355
x[4] = 0
share|improve this answer
    
Preliminary testing with Solver in Excel suggests this formulation might work, though it gives a slightly less optimal solution. However, I am not sure if this is any more amenable to Microsoft Solver Foundation. It just shifts the problem of defining the goal (which is difficult due to the matrix multiplication) to defining the constraint. – Craig W Jul 3 '12 at 20:50
    
(Sorry for late response, I've been on travel.) When you claim LP solution is less optimal, I assume you are looking at the 2-norm (sum of squared differences). If you instead consider the 1-norm (sum of absolute differences), I am fairly sure the LP solution is the better one. I do not have access to the Frontline Solver, so I will try to formulate your problem using Solver Foundation. I'll try to be back with an updated answer as soon as possible. – Anders Gustafsson Jul 5 '12 at 18:15
    
You are correct, 1-norm is better with your formulation while 2-norm is better with the original formulation. If your formulation can be done with Solver Foundation I think it would be a good solution. – Craig W Jul 5 '12 at 18:34
    
@CraigW Now I have updated the answer with Solver Foundation code to solve the non-linear problem. – Anders Gustafsson Jul 5 '12 at 19:51
    
Excellent! The part I missed was realizing you aren't constrained to defining the goal in one line of code. Thanks! – Craig W Jul 5 '12 at 20:36

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