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I have a string where I need to grab each char and do some checking.

std::string key = "test"
int i = 0;
while (key.at(i))
{
    // do some checking
    i++;
}

The problem with this is, eventually the index i will be out of range, so the system will crash. How can I fix this?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
I suggest you read about the c++ string class. cplusplus.com/reference/string/string –  Chris Dargis Jul 3 '12 at 1:37
2  
No, reading a null character won't crash. Where did you get that idea from? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 3 '12 at 1:38
    
the "key.at(i)" crashes when i is over the length of the string, says xcode. –  unwise guy Jul 3 '12 at 1:42
1  
@R.MartinhoFernandes: I think OP is referring to going out of range. But this correction is certainly necessary. –  Chris Dargis Jul 3 '12 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
std::string key = "test"
for(int i = 0; i < key.length(); i++)
{
    //do some checking
}
share|improve this answer
    
headdesk Duh. Thanks for the edit, @R.MartinhoFernandes –  WendiKidd Jul 3 '12 at 1:38
for(auto i = key.cbegin(); i != key.cend(); ++i)
{
    // do some checking
    // call *i to get a char
}
share|improve this answer
    
If C++11 is involved, the code works as is (s[s.length()] is guaranteed to be zero for all std::strings). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 3 '12 at 1:53
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Woah, that's interesting. I take it length() was changed to not include the null terminator? But... doesn't that break a lot of backwards compatibility... –  Dave Jul 3 '12 at 1:54
    
It never included the null terminator (i.e. std::string().length() == 0). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 3 '12 at 1:57
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Well, what changed with C++11 then? –  Dave Jul 3 '12 at 2:15
    
@Dave, previously, reading s[s.length()] was undefined. Now it isn't. You're now allowed to read exactly one character beyond the end of the string (with operator[]; you're still not allowed to dereference end()). –  Rob Kennedy Jul 3 '12 at 4:08

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