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I'm working on a SQLite database schema that was originally designed with composite foreign/primary keys and I'm trying to change it to use a surrogate key instead. Creating a new column for the surrogate key was easy, but now I need to link the surrogate keys back to the parent table - what is the best way to do that?

Old schema excerpt:

CREATE TABLE "parent" (
    "caseid"  TEXT NOT NULL,
    "issueid" INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "data"    TEXT,
    PRIMARY KEY("caseid", "issueid")
)

CREATE TABLE "child" (
    "caseid"    TEXT NOT NULL,
    "issueid"   INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "childdata" TEXT,
    FOREIGN KEY("caseid", "issueid") REFERENCES parent("caseid", "issueid")
)

New schema excerpt:

CREATE TABLE "parent" (
    "id"      INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    "caseid"  TEXT NOT NULL,
    "issueid" INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "data"    TEXT
)

CREATE TABLE "child" (
    "id"        INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    "childdata" TEXT,
    "parent_id" INTEGER REFERENCES parent("id")
)

My question is, after filling the new child table with the data from the original child table, how do I fill the "parent_id" field, which is now a surrogate key rather than a composite foreign key? Is there an easy way to do this as a SQL command?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First alter child table by appending the new id column, but not (yet) removing the old caseid+issueid columns:

CREATE TABLE "parent" (
    "id"      INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    "caseid"  TEXT NOT NULL,
    "issueid" INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "data"    TEXT
);

CREATE TABLE "child" (
    "id"        INTEGER PRIMARY KEY,
    "caseid"    TEXT NOT NULL,
    "issueid"   INTEGER NOT NULL,
    "childdata" TEXT,
    "parent_id" INTEGER REFERENCES parent("id")
);

Update child.parent_id with some meaningful value:

UPDATE child
SET parent_id = (
  SELECT parent.id
  FROM   parent
  WHERE  parent.caseid  = child.caseid
    AND  parent.issueid = child.issueid
);

Now you can safely drop child's caseid/issueid columns.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was converging to a similar solution but I momentarily forgot how to update rows with a select statement. (Also too bad SQLite doesn't allow you to drop columns directly - I have to do an extra step of copying a table over with the new data to drop the extra columns, but otherwise it works perfect) –  Kevin S. Jul 3 '12 at 6:51
    
By using CREATE TEMPORARY VIEW it is possible to use only one full table copy, if necessary :) –  biziclop Jul 3 '12 at 7:00

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