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Say I have a function that does the following in Vb.net

For i as decimal = 0 to mstrItems.count - 1
  mstrItems.item(i).activate
next

And I have classes as such that both classes, though different object type, have the function activate.

I would like to iterate my Items as above, having the list include any type of object, not just one specific type, and have the different objects all perform the activate function in the same way, though they are different object types.

Cheers! Martin

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Alternatively, you could define an interface and implement it in all your different Types:

Interface IActivateable
  Sub Activate
End Interface

Class MyType1: Implements IActivateable
Sub Activate Implements IActivateable.Activate
'some implementation details here ...
End Sub
End Class

Class MyType2: Implements IActivateable
Sub Activate Implements IActivateable.Activate
'some implementation details here ...
End Sub
End Class

Then you can cast each type as the interface you want to handle:

 Dim myList as new list(of IActivateable)
 myList.add(new MyType1)
 myList.add(new MyType2)

 for each obj as IActivateable in myList
     obj.Activate
 end for
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - you beat me to it – Jeremy Thompson Jul 3 '12 at 5:31
1  
This way, you also implement the OOP design fundamental "Program to an interface, not an implementation" :) (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_Patterns) – Jim McKeon Jul 3 '12 at 5:33
    
Bah you beat me to it. Curses! – SSS Jul 3 '12 at 5:34
    
@JimMcKeon: Well, to be fair, that OOP design fundamental doesn't literally mean "interfaces" in the .NET sense. An abstract base class fits that fundamental just fine :) But indeed, interfaces are another tool in the tool belt to accomplish this task. It depends on what the objects and types are and what they mean, and a lot on personal preference from the developer. – David Jul 3 '12 at 5:59

To give you some searchable terminology, what you're looking to do is use polymorphism to make use of the Strategy Pattern.

At its simplest, what you want is to have a base class (possibly abstract, I don't know the VB terminology for these things though) from which your multiple classes inherit. It's a kind of high-level abstraction which represents the common functionality between those classes. Something like this:

Class Car
    Overridable Sub Drive()
        Throw New NotImplementedException
    End Sub()
End Class

Class GasPoweredCar
    Inherits Car
    Overrides Sub Drive()
        ' logic for driving a gas-powered car
    End Sub
End Class

Class SolarPoweredCar
    Inherits Car
    Overrides Sub Drive()
        ' logic for driving a solar-powered car
    End Sub
End Class

And so on. The idea is that there's one common thing you're trying to accomplish (Drive in this case) but multiple different implementations would accomplish it in different ways. But since all of those implementations are still a Car then you can treat them as such (which is where polymorphism comes in).

So instead of having a list of GasPoweredCar and a list of SolarPoweredCar you can have a single combined list of Car which contains both. You don't need to know what kind of car it is in order to simply invoke the Drive function.

For i As decimal = 0 To listOfCars.count - 1
    listOfCars.Item(i).Drive
Next

Or more simply:

For Each car As Car In listOfCars
    car.Drive
Next
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing, thanks! – marscom Jul 3 '12 at 5:30

The alternative to Davids excellent answer is using Interfaces.

The GasPoweredCar and SolarPoweredCar classes could implement an interface:

interface ICar { void Drive(); }.

Both classes would have their own internal implementation of the Drive method. Then when iterating over Gas or Solar cars you could cast the class to the interface and call the method.

If David's isn't ideal I am Happy to elaborate, just let me know.

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1  
I just implemented the polymorphism and its working, though its good to know about interfaces too :D, no need to elaborate now though since I have a few answers on that now too :D – marscom Jul 3 '12 at 5:52

An alternative to polymorphism is to use an Interface:

Module Module1

    Sub Main()
    Dim lstClass As New List(Of IMyInterface)
    lstClass.Add(New FirstClass("A"))
    lstClass.Add(New SecondClass("B"))
    lstClass.Add(New FirstClass("C"))
    lstClass.Add(New SecondClass("D"))

    For i As Integer = 0 To lstClass.Count - 1
      lstClass(i).Activate()
    Next i
  End Sub

  Interface IMyInterface
    Sub Activate()
  End Interface
  Class FirstClass
    Implements IMyInterface

    Public Property MyProperty As String
    Sub New(s As String)
      MyProperty = s
    End Sub

    Sub Activate() Implements IMyInterface.Activate
      MsgBox("First class activate: " & MyProperty)
    End Sub
  End Class

  Class SecondClass
    Implements IMyInterface
    Public Property MyProperty As String
    Sub New(s As String)
      MyProperty = s
    End Sub

    Sub Activate() Implements IMyInterface.Activate
      MsgBox("Second class activate: " & MyProperty)
    End Sub
  End Class

End Module
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