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I am trying to load the MNIST dataset linked here in Python 3.2 using this program:

import pickle
import gzip
import numpy


with gzip.open('mnist.pkl.gz', 'rb') as f:
    l = list(pickle.load(f))
    print(l)

Unfortunately, it gives me the error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "mnist.py", line 7, in <module>
     train_set, valid_set, test_set = pickle.load(f)
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0x90 in position 614: ordinal not in range(128)

I then tried to decode the pickled file in Python 2.7, and re-encode it. So, I ran this program in Python 2.7:

import pickle
import gzip
import numpy


with gzip.open('mnist.pkl.gz', 'rb') as f:
    train_set, valid_set, test_set = pickle.load(f)

    # Printing out the three objects reveals that they are
    # all pairs containing numpy arrays.

    with gzip.open('mnistx.pkl.gz', 'wb') as g:
        pickle.dump(
            (train_set, valid_set, test_set),
            g,
            protocol=2)  # I also tried protocol 0.

It ran without error, so I reran this program in Python 3.2:

import pickle
import gzip
import numpy

# note the filename change
with gzip.open('mnistx.pkl.gz', 'rb') as f:
    l = list(pickle.load(f))
    print(l)

However, it gave me the same error as before. How do I get this to work?

share|improve this question
    
there are compatibility breaks between 2.7 and 3.x. especially string vs unicode. And picking a numpy object requires that both systems load the numpy module but those modules are different. Sorry I don't have an answer but this might not be do-able and is probably not advisable. If this are big things (gzip), maybe hdf5 with pytables?? – Phil Cooper Jul 3 '12 at 7:01
    
@PhilCooper: Thanks, your comment (post this as an answer?) clued me in to the right answer. I could have used hdf5, but it seemed complicated to learn, so I went with numpy.save/load and this worked. – Neil G Jul 3 '12 at 7:33
    
h5py is very simple to use, almost certainly much easier then solving nebulous compatibility problems with pickling numpy arrays. – DaveP Jul 3 '12 at 8:53
    
You say you "ran this program under Python 2.7". OK but what did you run under 3.2? :-) The same? – Lennart Regebro Jul 3 '12 at 15:50
    
@LennartRegebro: After running the second program that pickles the arrays, I ran the first program (substituting the filename mnistx.pkl.gz) in Python 3.2. It didn't work, which I think illustrates some kind of incompatibility. – Neil G Jul 4 '12 at 5:45
up vote 16 down vote accepted

This seems like some sort of incompatibility. It's trying to load a "binstring" object, which is assumed to be ASCII, while in this case it is binary data. If this is a bug in the Python 3 unpickler, or a "misuse" of the pickler by numpy, I don't know.

Here is something of a workaround, but I don't know how meaningful the data is at this point:

import pickle
import gzip
import numpy

with open('mnist.pkl', 'rb') as f:
    u = pickle._Unpickler(f)
    u.encoding = 'latin1'
    p = u.load()
    print(p)

Unpickling it in Python 2 and then repickling it is only going to create the same problem again, so you need to save it in another format.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for looking into this! – Neil G Jul 5 '12 at 9:01
31  
You can use pickle.load(file_obj, encoding='latin1') (at least in Python 3.3). This seems to work. – Tom Aldcroft Jan 16 '14 at 14:15
try:
   import cPickle as pickle
except:
   import pickle

with gzip.open('../data/mnist.pkl.gz', 'rb') as f:
    training_data, validation_data, test_data = pickle.load(f, encoding='latin1') 

TLDR;

I received the exact same error message:

UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0x90 in position 614:  
ordinal not in range(128)

on the same code as the OP when converting code for Neural Networks and Deep Learning from Python 2.7 to 3.5

and then applied the answer from Lennart Regebro.

and received a new error:

  File "C:\Users\xxx\Anaconda3\lib\pickle.py", line 1039, in load
    dispatch[key[0]](self)
KeyError: 31

Upon looking at the raw file I realized that the source file was zipped as the OP had noted in the question but the answer did not address this.

So for others that have the same problem here is the modified version that worked:

with gzip.open('../data/mnist.pkl.gz', 'rb') as f:
    training_data, validation_data, test_data = pickle.load(f, encoding='latin1') 

notice that open has been changed to gzip.open

Also of note when converting from Python 2.7 to 3.5 add

try:
   import cPickle as pickle
except:
   import pickle

See: What’s New In Python 3.0

A common pattern in Python 2.x is to have one version of a module implemented in pure Python, with an optional accelerated version implemented as a C extension; for example, pickle and cPickle. This places the burden of importing the accelerated version and falling back on the pure Python version on each user of these modules. In Python 3.0, the accelerated versions are considered implementation details of the pure Python versions. Users should always import the standard version, which attempts to import the accelerated version and falls back to the pure Python version. The pickle / cPickle pair received this treatment.

and pickle and cPickle – Python object serialization

share|improve this answer

It looks like there are some compatablility issues in pickle between 2.x and 3.x due to the move to unicode. Your file appears to be pickled with python 2.x and decoding it in 3.x could be troublesome.

I'd suggest unpickling it with python 2.x and saving to a format that plays more nicely across the two versions you're using.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was trying to do. Which format do you recommend? – Neil G Jul 3 '12 at 7:03
4  
I think the problem might have been encoding numpy dtype, which might be a string. In any case, I ended up using numpy.save/load to bridge the gap between python 2 and 3, and this worked. – Neil G Jul 3 '12 at 7:32

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