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class A
{
   public int m_a;
}

void fun(ref int a)
{
   ...
}

fun(ref new A().m_a);

in fun,how do "ref int a" keep the object(new A()) from being reclaimed before returning from fun?

<example 0>
using System;

class A
{
    public int m_a;
    ~A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("~A()");
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void fun(ref int a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Begin<<<<<<<<<<<<<<");
        a++;
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        Console.WriteLine("End>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        fun(ref new A().m_a);

        Console.WriteLine("Over");
    }
}


output:
Begin<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
~A()
End>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Over

<example 1>
using System;

class A
{
    public int m_a;
    ~A()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("~A()");
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void fun(ref int a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Begin<<<<<<<<<<<<<<");
        a++;
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        //add a code
        a++;

        Console.WriteLine("End>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        fun(ref new A().m_a);

        Console.WriteLine("Over");
    }
}

output:
Begin<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
End>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Over
~A()

please build by release mode in VS. I view the ASM code, only two lines are added:

             a++;
0000002f  mov         eax,dword ptr [ebp-4] 
00000032  inc         dword ptr [eax] 

other parts between two examples are identical. How do GC make sure the variable a is no longer usefull in machine code?

share|improve this question
    
Is this in comparison to another example where you do understand what's happening with GC? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 7:25
    
two examples are added. please view the diffecrence between outputs. –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 8:05
    
You might want to look at this old presentation, slide 30 onwards. Shows how the GC/JIT collaborate - it's nothing to do with any code inside the method itself. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 8:13
    
it's helpful. but I still not get answer. run the two examples and record their machine code to compare. then find the difference is only two asm instruction. I just doubt how the two static asm code make the previous GC.Collect() not reclaim the obj(new A()); –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 9:53
1  
The table doesn't need to be changed - the tables says "when the instruction pointer (IP) is in this range of addresses, these variables can contain valid references." So the GC just has to look at where the IP is in the method, find which range that belongs to, and then knows which references need tracking. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 10:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd thought this old presentation (Slide 30 onwards) to be sufficient, but it developed into a bit of back-and-forth in the comments section, so I thought I'd put an answer up.

Whenever the JIT prepares any method, it also constructs a "table", that maps which local variable slots are "live" at any particular point in the method. So, when the GC is examining each thread, it takes the Instruction Pointer for that thread, consults the table, and uses that to determine live references within the current method.

There is nothing written into the machine code for a particular method that has to notify the GC of anything - the JITs analysis covers all paths through the code, and only has to be done once for each method.

Under Debug, the JIT marks all variables as used for the entire body of the method - this keeps references alive longer than strictly necessary, but does mean that you can examine the state of variables after their last use in the method (via e.g. Locals or Autos windows, or any other way you may suddenly wish to reference a variable)

share|improve this answer
    
Pay my respects to your profound knowledge. –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 15:36

It depends how a is used in fun. The GC is able to determine if any given object is rooted. In this case a is an alias to the field m_a in an instance of A and the object is considered rooted. However, if the JIT compiler determines a is not used in the remainder of fun then from that point onward in the method, the instance of A will no longer be rooted and is eligible for garbage collection.

Some examples:

void fun(ref int a)
{
   // forgot to use a. our object is already eligible for GC!
   for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
   {
      Console.WriteLine(i);
   }
}

void fun2(ref int a)
{       
   for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
   {
      Console.WriteLine(a);
   }
   // GC has to wait until a is no longer in use. now our object is eligible for GC.
}

void fun3(ref int a)
{
   // can't gc yet. a is still being used.
   int b = a;
   // b has a copy of the value in a so now our object is eligible for GC.
   for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
   {
      Console.WriteLine(b);
   }
}

Update:

I'm not an expert in how this is implemented in the clr, but my understanding is that using ref causes a managed pointer to the field m_a to be passed into fun. When the GC runs, roots are determined from references to heap objects in statics, call stacks of all threads, and registers. I'm guessing here, but maybe that managed pointer to the field m_a stores a reference to the container object. Or maybe the GC can determine which object a given managed pointer is in. Either way the object is marked as rooted from that managed reference.

share|improve this answer
    
In view of language, I know that. and I agree with your view. but now please view how to implement that in machine code? in my earlier thought, fun(ref int a) will get the pointer to object(obj) and pointer to member(m_a). So the fun can keep obj from being reclaimed before operation on m_a completed. but by view asm code in debugging, fun only get pointer to member(m_a), then how do it keep the obj? –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 8:10
    
@Vince see update. I'm curious why you think the dissassembly should differ by more than two instructions in fun. All you know after the second increment is that A is eligible for GC. The jitter doesn't have to mark it as so and gc may not even run at that point. Also adding a finalizer changes the collection semantics of the object as now the finalization queue will also get a reference to the object. –  mike z Jul 3 '12 at 9:05
    
:) I mean adding the second increment result in obj(new A()) will not be reclaimed by previous explicit GC. I just doubt how it implement that in asm code. –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 9:21
    
Good summary. Thanks. –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 15:37

You would have to create the A instance beforehand and keep a reference to it, along the lines of:

    A a = new A();
    fun(ref a.m_a);

Otherwise, when fun returns, the new instance of A goes out of scope, and is therefore up for garbage collection.

share|improve this answer
1  
That doesn't sound convincing at all. –  Marc Gravell Jul 3 '12 at 7:31
    
in debug mode, it will not reclaim a,before it go out of scope. but in release mode, it will reclaim a after fun before it go out of scope, provided no use of a after fun. we are talking about how "ref int m_a" keep reference to obj containing m_a in machine code? –  Vince Jul 3 '12 at 8:15

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