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I have a java library to query mysql database, the return the ResultSet to another Java function. Because of the mysql timeout issue, I used c3p0 pool to implement the query.

cpds = new ComboPooledDataSource();
cpds.setDriverClass("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
cpds.setJdbcUrl(url);
cpds.setUser(user);
cpds.setPassword(passwd);
cpds.setMaxPoolSize(maxPoolSize);
cpds.setMinPoolSize(minPoolSize);
cpds.setAcquireIncrement(20);


public ResultSet fetch() {
    PreparedStatement pst = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;
    String query = null;
    Connection conn = null;

    try {

        conn = cpds.getConnection();

        query = "...";
        pst = conn.prepareStatement(query);
        rs = pst.executeQuery();

    } catch (SQLException ex)  {
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(Query.class.getName());                       
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage(), ex);
    }finally {
        try {
            if(conn != null) {
                conn.close();
            }
        } catch (SQLException ex) {
            Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(Query.class.getName());
            lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage(), ex);
        }   
    }   

    return rs;
  }       
}

I got this error

 SEVERE: Operation not allowed after ResultSet closed java.sql.SQLException: Operation not allowed after ResultSet closed 
    at com.mysql.jdbc.SQLError.createSQLException(SQLError.java:1075)
    at com.mysql.jdbc.SQLError.createSQLException(SQLError.java:989)
    at com.mysql.jdbc.SQLError.createSQLException(SQLError.java:984)
    at com.mysql.jdbc.SQLError.createSQLException(SQLError.java:929)
    at com.mysql.jdbc.ResultSetImpl.checkClosed(ResultSetImpl.java:795)
    at com.mysql.jdbc.ResultSetImpl.next(ResultSetImpl.java:7146)
    at com.mchange.v2.c3p0.impl.NewProxyResultSet.next(NewProxyResultSet.java:622)

The reason it obvirous, but I am thinking what is the best way to call Mysql query and get results in a function.

share|improve this question
    
Some variation of this question has been asked numerous times before, see for instance stackoverflow.com/questions/4106606/… Additionally, c3p0 is irrelevant to the question. –  sridhara Jul 3 '12 at 7:19
    
From which line is the error coming from? –  Chan Jul 3 '12 at 7:37
    
The problem is the upper level function get ResultSet Object rs, instead of Connection Object conn, I can do rs.close(), but I can not use conn.close(). My following question is when I do rs.close(), will connection be released as well? Becasue I need to release the connection, and put it back to connection pool. –  yzhang Jul 3 '12 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

In the finally clause, the connection is closed before the method returns.

}finally {
    try {
        if(conn != null) {
            conn.close();
        }
    } catch (SQLException ex) {
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(Query.class.getName());
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage(), ex);
    }   
}   

This Connection is a PooledConnection managed by c3p0. The close() method just return the Connection to pool, without close it. Statements are cleaned-up before the Connection is returned to pool to prevent resource leaks and pool corruption.

When Statements are closed, its current ResultSet object, if one exists, is also closed. Check the java 7 API Statement close() method here

So, the ResultSet is closed when fetch() returns.

Sugestions:

It´s a common addressed problem in java JDBC programming.

First option, code to change fetch() to operate as a template method

public ResultSet fetch(ResultSetIterator rsIterator ) {
    PreparedStatement pst = null;
    ResultSet rs = null;
    String query = null;
    Connection conn = null;

    try {

        conn = cpds.getConnection();

        query = "select * from tb_user";
        pst = conn.prepareStatement(query);
        rs = pst.executeQuery();

        rsIterator.iterate(rs);

    } catch (SQLException ex)  {
        Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(Query.class.getName());                       
        lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage(), ex);
    }finally {
        try {
            if(conn != null) {
                conn.close();
            }
        } catch (SQLException ex) {
            Logger lgr = Logger.getLogger(Query.class.getName());
            lgr.log(Level.SEVERE, ex.getMessage(), ex);
        }   
    }   

    return rs;
} 

ResultSetIterator has the code to process the ResultSet

Second option, use a tool already implemented, like Commons DbUtils, follow the link to see the samples

Other option, use a ER Mapping tool, JPA, hibernate, etc... that abstract the connection handle

Finally, to address the timeout problem and test of connection pooled, use DBCP instead of c3p0, a more robust solution

private static DataSource setupDataSource() {
    BasicDataSource ds = new BasicDataSource();
    ds.setDriverClassName(getDriver());
    ds.setUsername(getUser());
    ds.setPassword(getPassword());
    ds.setUrl(getConnectionString());

    ds.setDefaultAutoCommit(false);
    ds.setInitialSize(4);
    ds.setMaxActive(60);
    ds.setMaxIdle(10);

    ds.setValidationQuery("/* ping */ SELECT 1");//config to validate against mysql
    ds.setValidationQueryTimeout(3);
    ds.setTestOnBorrow(true);
    ds.setTestOnReturn(true);

    return ds;
}
share|improve this answer

Error stack says that

SEVERE: Operation not allowed after ResultSet closed java.sql.SQLException: 
  Operation not allowed after ResultSet closed 

This error is thrown because, you tried to use the returned instance of ResultSet object,
which is actually released during a database connection close request. And hence you can't use returned ResultSet instance any more constructively.

Documentation says that con.close() "Releases this Connection object's database and JDBC resources immediately instead of waiting for them to be automatically released.". Here JDBC resources means all the Statement objects, ResultSet objects, etc that are created using the connection object that is being closed.

Suggested Solution:
You should define a ResultDataObject class or something meaningful and fill a list of its instances while looping the resultset object in the fetch() method. Sample code snippet is shown below.

public List<ResultDataObject> fetch() {  
    List<ResultDataObject> list = null; // new ArrayList<ResultDataObject>( 24 );  
    // ...  
    rs = pst.executeQuery();  

    // now prepare the list with results filled and return  
    if ( list == null ) list = new ArrayList<ResultDataObject>( 24 );  

    // now read from result set  
    while ( rs.next() ) {  
        ResultDataObject resultData = new ResultDataObject(); // or something relevant  

        // use the following type methods to read from rs and fill result object  
        resultData.setXXX( rs.getXXX( ... ) );
        // ...

        list.add( resultData );
    } // while rs  

    // do something if required before return
    // ...

    return list;
} // fetch()  
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for suggestion. My concern is the resource overhead, I need to copy/free ResultSet twice, which is big cost for large query. Do you have any other way? –  yzhang Jul 3 '12 at 14:35
    
@user1374194 Alternatively, you can pass a con object to fetch method but don't close it in the fetch method. Return rs in fetch method and use it in the calling method before closing the connection object. –  Ravinder Jul 3 '12 at 14:40

Thank you everyone for suggestion. I have some ideas and concerns:

1) Run ResultSet rs.close() in the upper level function. But I am not sure whether the connection resource is released or not. It is very important to release the connection resource.

2) create another Object List to temparary save ResultSet structure, and return it to upper level function. My concern is the cost, since I need to create/free the temparary resource twice. It is a problem for large query.

3) create a fake query function "SELECT 1", and run it in upper level function for specific time (e.g. before mysql wait_timeout is triggerred, like every 20 mins). This one will use mysql timeout to close the connection. It is kind of waste mysql resource.

share|improve this answer
    
You should have updated your post with these concerns. –  Ravinder Jul 3 '12 at 14:44

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