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I have a class which is in charge for error handling. I would like to execute a process, if the destructor is called. But sadly the process would not start. The new processes call an exe with some arguments, which should send an email. Why does this not work?

~ErrorH()
{
    if ((int)e > 0)
        SendErrorMail();
}

private void SendErrorMail()
{
    if (File.Exists("C:\\Program Files (x86)\\MailSend\\MailSend.exe"))
    {
        ProcessStartInfo mailsend = new ProcessStartInfo();
        mailsend.FileName = "C:\\Program Files (x86)\\MailSend\\MailSend.exe";
        mailsend.Arguments = "…";
        Process.Start(mailsend);
    }
}

If I execute the SendErrorMail function for example in the constructor, everything works fine. If I look at the debugger it seems like I reach the Process.Start(mailsend); command. What went wrong? How could I fix this?

Edit

Ok now I have used the IDisposable method. It works fine, but does is use it correctly?

class ErrorH : IDisposable
{
private bool disposed = false;
...
public void Dispose()
{
    Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

protected virtual void Dispose(bool desposing)
{
    if(!this.disposed)
        if ((int)e > 0)
            SendErrorMail();
    disposed = true;
}

In Program I use:

using (Parameter p = new Parameter(args[0]))
{
...
}

The class ErrorH inheritance from Parameter.

Greetz

share|improve this question
    
Did you try to display a mbox in the destructor?? It may never been called yet by GC –  Desolator Jul 3 '12 at 7:42
    
Destructors are meant to be called when the object is garbage collected that you cannot ensure when it happens during your program lifecycle? –  Furqan Jul 3 '12 at 7:43
    
No, but I have tested it actually. The MessageBox appears. –  hofmeister Jul 3 '12 at 7:44
    
@Taz Is class Paramater implementing IDisposable? –  Desolator Jul 3 '12 at 8:08
    
Paramater is a subclass von ErrorH –  hofmeister Jul 3 '12 at 8:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than using destructors, which cannot be guaranteed to be called at current time, use interface System.IDisposable.

Usually, it is a bad practice to use destructors in C# like C++, for example. Since we cannot determine the specific time the objects will be destroyed by Garbage Collector (GC), C# provides IDisposable which has a single method Dispose, that you can call it either explicitly when you finish using the object, or implicitly by using block.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works greate, but does I use it correctly? Please see me Edit. Greetz –  hofmeister Jul 3 '12 at 8:08

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