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I have a category/file tree structure. Both categories and files can have parents, so I derived them from a common base class that has a Parent property. Since all parents will obviously always be categories (files can't be a parent), it seems to make sense to make the Parent property of the node be the CategoryNode type.

Is it bad form for the base class to refer to the derived class? If so, why? What's a better way to structure this, if so?

class Node {
    public CategoryNode Parent {get; set;}
}

class File : Node {
    ...
}

class CategoryNode : Node {
    ...
}
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AFAIU, they both extend the same base class for sharing properties so Why not use on single class having recursive reference to itself? with additional properties to distinguish them. –  Furqan Jul 3 '12 at 7:37
    
yes thats bad. Causes circular dependency. Base should not know anything about Derived. –  Tilak Jul 3 '12 at 7:41
    
@Furqan, the File node doesn't need the extra stuff that CategoryNode has, such as children, so I don't think it should derive from CategoryNode. –  Kelsie Jul 3 '12 at 8:15
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the property Parent is actually a common properties of all descendants and always of kind CategoryNode, it's not a problem. Semantically speaking it's correct and technically I think its correct too as soon as you remain in the same library (to avoid circular references).

This can be a problem when you write code like this :

// BAD CODE
if(myProp is subclassA) 
{ ... 
} 
else if (myProp is syubclassB) 
{ ...
}

This code is bad, because you loose the advantage of inheritance.

Even in the .Net Framework there is such constructs. The first example that comes in my mind is the XObject.Parent property.

XElement inherits XObject, and XObject publish a property of type XElement. Same as your snippet.

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You could do ...

interface IParent {
    ...
}

class Node {
    public IParent Parent {get; set;}
}

class File : Node {
    ...
}

class CategoryNode : Node, IParent {
    ...
}

This way, you don't need to refer to a derived object in the base class, plus, you're more flexible in what can actually become a parent, in case you get additional object types at a later point in time. Also, any functionality that is relevant just for a parent can be declared in that interface.

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Maybe you can add in interface : IEnumerable<IParent> ChildNodes ? –  Steve B Jul 3 '12 at 7:52
    
@Steve This is a design question. Surely that's possible, but then I wouldn't call the interface IParent anymore. The OP wanted to refer to a parent object, and not to a (list of) child object(s). To me it looks strange to have something like that declared as IEnumerable<IParent> Children, and personally I'd rename the interface to something more fitting ... if you have a large project with many examples of that kind of naming style, you're on the road to hell IMHO ... –  takrl Jul 3 '12 at 8:04
    
you are right... this can lead to confusion –  Steve B Jul 3 '12 at 8:08
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The base class shouldn't know who derives from it.

If you have such a case, you probably dont want inheritance. You should just use some form of coupling.

The File and CategoryNode should hold a Node member in your case.

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I can't agree with you. What about if Parent is always a CategoryNode? It can be a problem in in the base class there are things like if(myProp is subclassA) { ... } else if (myProper is syubclassB) { ...}. Such things are dirty. But not the sample the OP suggests –  Steve B Jul 3 '12 at 7:38
    
But it's not. we just saw that the parent can be File, which is in no way associated to CategoryNode. –  Yochai Timmer Jul 3 '12 at 7:40
    
the OP said that files can't be a parent –  Steve B Jul 3 '12 at 7:41
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Other options will be to change class hierarchy to make the CategoryNode a root class (a), or change the property type to Node (b).

Both of these possibilities are not good: (a) File will have all functionality CategoryNode has which it doesn't need. (b) It will hide object type (which is always CategoryNode). This may follow to invalid cast errors somewhere else in your code. For example, if you forget there is always a CategoryNode instance.

Considering this, I believe current code is OK.

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