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I am having this Linq To SQL query which is taking Customer Category from database.The CustCategory will be defined already.Here is the query.

public IList<string> GetAccountType()
        {
            using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
            {
                var  acctype = db.mem_types.Select(account=>account.CustCategory).Distinct().ToList();
                if (acctype != null)
                {
                    return acctype;
                }
            }

        }

Currently I am getting an error that Not all code paths return a value.If I am always certain that the value is there in the database then do I need to check for null,If I need to check for null then how do I handle this. Can anyone help me with this. Any suggestions are welcome.

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Since your function returns a List of account types, I'd call it GetAccountTypes (note the plural s). –  Heinzi Jul 3 '12 at 8:06
    
@Heinzi Thanks a lot for that.I am doing all database operations in seperate classes and then I try to call these methods from code behind ,will yourecommend this approach.Is it good. –  freebird Jul 3 '12 at 8:08
    
@Heinzi Can you help me with this question stackoverflow.com/questions/11305761/… –  freebird Jul 3 '12 at 8:13
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Since Enumerable.ToList never returns null (see the Return Value section of the documentation), you can safely remove the if.

EDIT: Note that, no matter what your database contains, acctype will never be null:

  • If no value is found in the database, the return value will be an empty list (which is different than null).
  • If one record is found and its value is null, the return value will be a valid list with one entry, whose value is null. Still, the list itself is not null.
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So you recommend that I dont need to check that , but if I am doing some other query and if it is null then what do I return.Thanks. –  freebird Jul 3 '12 at 7:40
    
@freebird: I've extended my answer to address your question. –  Heinzi Jul 3 '12 at 7:42
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This is not about LINQ to SQL, the method GetAccountType() must return IList<string>. You should return return acctype; and then check this returned list later using Any(), something like:

if(GetAccountType.Any()){
     //not empty
}
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How about something like this for a fairly clean and readable solution?:

(Note, updated: removed the check for null, since it would clearly not have any effect).

public IList<string> GetAccountType()
{
        var acctype = new List<string>();
        using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
        {
            acctype = db.mem_types.Select(
                         account=>account.CustCategory).Distinct().ToList();
        }

        return acctype;
    }
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Worth a try , not a bad idea.Thanks. –  freebird Jul 3 '12 at 7:57
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What happens if:

if (acctype != null)

Is null? What is your method supposed to return?

You need to return something

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That is what is confusing me , what should I return in that case. –  freebird Jul 3 '12 at 7:40
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You need to return a value from your function:

    public IList<string> GetAccountType()
            {
                using (var db = new DataClasses1DataContext())
                {
                    var  acctype = db.mem_types.Select(account=>account.CustCategory).Distinct().ToList();
                    if (acctype != null)
                    {
                        return acctype;
                    }
                }
                return acctype;
            }
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