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If I have child class,the child class inherits all methods from the parent,but how do I use functions from the child class in the parent class? Is that what abstraction is? How do I accomplish it?

My code:

type
cParent = class(TObject)
private
  function ParentFunction:byte;
  function ChildFunction:byte;virtual;abstract;
end;

type
cChild = class(cParent)
private function ChildFunction:byte;override;
end;

function cChild.ChildFunction:byte;
begin
  Exit(20);
end;

function cParent.ParentFunction:byte;
begin
  Exit(10);
end;

var
c:cParent;

begin
  c:= cParent.Create;
  WriteLn(c.ChildFunction);
  Readln;
end.

It compiles file,but I get abstraction exception.

share|improve this question
    
When you say it compiles fine, do you really mean that you did not get a warning from the compiler telling you that you were instantiating an abstract class? You need to be more diligent about stamping out compiler hints and warnings, not just errors. – Rob Kennedy Jul 15 '09 at 12:15
    
Just a few comments regarding conventional style. It is usual in Delphi to prefix class (and other type) names with T, not c. The return value of functions is usually set by setting the implicit Result variable to a value, rather than using Exit i.e. Result := 10;, not Exit(10);. The Exit syntax was only added in D2009 Note: You can also use the function name, rather than result (ParentFunction := 10;) - the effect is the same and it is the original Pascal syntax – Gerry Coll Jul 15 '09 at 21:55
up vote 5 down vote accepted
c:= cParent.Create;
WriteLn(c.ChildFunction);

You create an instance of cParent class here. This class does only contain an abstract ChildFunction that can be overridden by other classes. The function is not implemented in cParent, so you get an abstract error.

The code works if you use the cChild class instead, where ChildFunction is implemented:

c:= cChild.Create;
WriteLn(c.ChildFunction);

For clarification, imagine a parent class named GeometricObject with an virtual abstract method CalculateVolume. You can now create child classes like SphereObject or BoxObject that implement CalculateVolume by using the formula for spheres/boxes. But it doesn't make sense to create an instance of GeometricObject and call CalculateVolume.

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Ok ,but then what is the use of "virtual","abstract" and "override" keyword? – Ivan Prodanov Jul 15 '09 at 10:54
2  
"virtual" means the method can be overridden by child classes. "abstract" means the method isn't implemented by the parent class, but can be implemented in child classes. "override", well, overrides virtual methods from parent classes. All abstract methods must be virtual, but methods can be virtual without being abstract. – schnaader Jul 15 '09 at 11:10
    
abstract methods are what C++ refers to as "pure virtual" methods. They must be implemented in a child class. – Gerry Coll Jul 16 '09 at 1:51

You create instance of cParent class. This class don't have implementation of childFunction. c must be instance of cChild class. Correct code: c := cChild.Create; WriteLn(c.ChildFunction);

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Create the instance using the child class:

c:= cChild.Create;
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It seems to me that you have confused inheritance relationships and possessive relationships. If you define a class "cChild" as inherited from class "cParent" then the class "cChild" is a "cParent", it does not mean, that the class "Parent" has access to any child classes. The only way you can call the abstract function "ChildFunction" in the class "cParent" is from another function, e.g. "ParentFunction", but only if the Object itself is not a "cParent":

function cParent.ParentFunction:byte;
begin
  Result := ChildFunction * 2;
end;

var
  c:cParent;

begin
  c:= cChild.Create;
  WriteLn(c.ParentFunction);
  Readln;
end.

Here, since c is a cChild, ParentFunction correctly calls ChildFunction, which is defined in cChild.

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In response to schnaader, regarding CS 101:

"virtual" means the method can be overridden by child classes.

Not only this, but non-virtual functions may happily be overridden by child classes. The difference is very important: when a virtual function is called by the parent class, the CHILD function will be executed. This allows child classes to implement functions that will be called by parent classes without the parent ever knowing anything about them. This is the essence of polymorphism.

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