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I am working on building a map reduce pipeline of jobs(with one MR job's output feeding to another as input). The values being passed around are fairly complex, in that there are lists of different types and hash maps with values as lists. Hadoop api does not seem to have a ListWritable. Am trying to write a generic one, but it seems i can't instantiate a generic type in my readFields implementation, unless i pass in the class type itself:

public class ListWritable<T extends Writable> implements Writable {
    private List<T> list;
    private Class<T> clazz;

    public ListWritable(Class<T> clazz) {
       this.clazz = clazz;
       list = new ArrayList<T>();
    }

    @Override
    public void write(DataOutput out) throws IOException {
        out.writeInt(list.size());
        for (T element : list) {
            element.write(out);
        }
     }

     @Override
     public void readFields(DataInput in) throws IOException{
     int count = in.readInt();
     this.list = new ArrayList<T>();
     for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        try {
            T obj = clazz.newInstance();
            obj.readFields(in);
            list.add(obj);
        } catch (InstantiationException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
      }
    }
}

But hadoop requires all writables to have a no argument constructor to read the values back. Has anybody tried to do the same and solved this problem? TIA.

share|improve this question

I have an extensive library of writables like this one, except that I always declare the type as an abstract class of self-bounded generic type, and when I use it I declare a trivial subclass with all types made concrete. Hadoop is so hideously reflection-based that you are almost always better off not using generics in actual jobs; however, generics can be very useful as supertypes of your jobs' I/O types.

E.g.

public abstract class AbstractListWritable< T extends Writable & Cloneable, U extends AbstractListWritable< T, U > >
implements Writable {
    T tCursor;
    List< T > ltBacking;
    protected AbstractListWritable( T tCursor ) {
        this.tCursor = tCursor.clone();
        this.ltBacking = new ArrayList< T >();
    }
    ...
    @Override
    public void readFields(DataInput in) throws IOException {
        int count = in.readInt();
        this.ltBacking.clear();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
            tCursor.readFields(in);
            list.add(tCursor.clone());
        }
    }
}

public class TextListWritable extends AbstractListWritable< Text, TextListWritable > {
    public TextListWritable() {
        super( new Text() );
    }
}

Thomas' answer would allow heterogeneous lists, except that since the generic type would preclude you ever creating one, and I/O is almost always the bottleneck in Hadoop, I don't recommend that strategy.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Judge. In your case then, you would need to implement readFields and write in your concrete implementations of this abstract base type? Actually that's what i wanted to avoid. – Guruprasad Venkatesh Jul 3 '12 at 8:57
    
No. You have stipulated that the element type of your list extends Writable, so you can use your implementation from the original post. UPDATE: I see the issue now. In this case you might create a "cursor" T instance in the concrete class and use it in the base class' implementation for readFields. T will also have to implement Cloneable. – Judge Mental Jul 3 '12 at 9:04

You have to write the classname within each record which is really verbose, so I recommend you to strong type that.

However your code must be changed to that:

@Override
public void write(DataOutput out) throws IOException {
    out.writeUTF(clazz.getName());
    out.writeInt(list.size());
    for (T element : list) {
        element.write(out);
    }
 }

 @Override
 public void readFields(DataInput in) throws IOException{
 clazz = Class.forName(in.readUTF());
 int count = in.readInt();
 this.list = new ArrayList<T>();
 for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    try {
        T obj = clazz.newInstance();
        obj.readFields(in);
        list.add(obj);
    } catch (InstantiationException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

Then you can provide a no argument constructor as well. But it takes the classname as UTF-8 string as overhead per record.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Thomas. Let me see if i can live with writing that extra bit of data per record. – Guruprasad Venkatesh Jul 3 '12 at 9:00
    
Great, I hope we can assume that T is always the same type. Otherwise you have to write the classname with every element of your list, which is much more verbose than that above. – Thomas Jungblut Jul 3 '12 at 9:02

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