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I'm trying to cut out some text from a scraped site and not sure what functions or library's I can use to make this easier:

example of code I run from PhantomJS:

var latest_release = page.evaluate(function () {
                // everything inside this function is executed inside our
                // headless browser, not PhantomJS.
                var links = $('[class="interesting"]');
                var releases = {};
                for (var i=0; i<links.length; i++) {
                    releases[links[i].innerHTML] = links[i].getAttribute("href");
                }

                // its important to take note that page.evaluate needs
                // to return simple object, meaning DOM elements won't work.
                return JSON.stringify(releases);
            }); 

Class interesting has what I need, surrounded by new lines and tabs and whatnot.

here it is:

{"\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null,"\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null,"\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null}

I tried string.slice("\n"); and nothing happened, I really want a effective way to be able to cut out strings like this, based on its relationship to those \n''s and \t's

By the way this was my split code:

var x = latest_release.split('\n');

Cheers.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
    var interesting = {
        "\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting1\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null,
        "\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting2\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null,
        "\n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting3\n\t\t\t\n\t\t":null
    }

    found = new Array();
    for(x in interesting) {
        found[found.length] = x.match(/\w+/g);
    }
    alert(found);
share|improve this answer
    
This was perfect! I'm going to look into regular expressions a lot now, I need to understand exactly how (/\w+/g) can transform the text so much. Pretty amazing. Thanks :) –  Joseph Jul 3 '12 at 10:13
2  
The regex as is will return an array of words if the interesting text has spaces in it. Just something to be aware of. –  Amith George Jul 4 '12 at 5:08

Its a simple case of stripping out all whitespace. A job that regexes do beautifully.

var s = "  \n\t\t\t\n\t\t\t\tI Am Interesting\n\t\t \t \n\t\t";
s = s.replace(/[\r\t\n]+/g, ''); // remove all non space whitespace
s = s.replace(/^\s+/, ''); // remove all space from the front
s = s.replace(/\s+$/, ''); // remove all space at the end :)
console.log(s);

Further reading: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/RegExp

share|improve this answer
new_string = string.replace("\n", "").replace("\t", "");
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1  
string.replace() can only find and replace the first condition they meet. –  Someth Victory Jul 3 '12 at 8:17
    
Yes I agree, we should use regular expressions here. I think that solution provided by Amith George will work –  Vladimir Kadalashvili Jul 3 '12 at 9:17
    
@SomethVictory You can use the global flag to replace all matches in a string - developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… . –  What Jul 3 '12 at 9:22

Could you try with "\\n" as pattern? your \n may be understood as plain string rather than special character

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, your right about the reason it didn't work, \\n works like a charm. however \\t will only remove one tab and not the others. –  Joseph Jul 3 '12 at 8:16
    
var x = latest_release.split('\\n'+'\\t'); this makes this :",\t\t,\t\t\tI_Am_Interesting,\t\t,\t":null, still have issue getting that middle part though, it only seems to go so far –  Joseph Jul 3 '12 at 8:18
    
you can use a Regex for more complicated split. Here is a website that helps building javascript regex, with some tutorials and live test : regular-expressions.info/javascriptexample.html –  Arcadien Jul 3 '12 at 8:22

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