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Let's say I have some c++ code:

if (error)
    goto exit;
... 
// size_t i = 0; //error
size_t i;
i = 0;
...
exit:
    ...

I understand we should not use goto, but still why does

size_t i;
i = 0;

compile whereas size_t i = 0; doesn't?

Why is such behavior enforced by the standard (mentioned by @SingerOfTheFall)?

It is possible to transfer into a block, but not in a way that bypasses declarations with initialization. A program that jumps from a point where a local variable with automatic storage duration is not in scope to a point where it is in scope is ill-formed unless the variable has POD type (3.9) and is declared without an initializer.

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marked as duplicate by Nawaz, Bo Persson, RedX, Donal Fellows, talonmies Jul 3 '12 at 18:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Which compiler? –  Adriano Repetti Jul 3 '12 at 8:09
    
@Adriano: g++ 4.1.1 –  Akshit Khurana Jul 3 '12 at 8:20
    
Added language-design because you're asking about rationale for design decisions for a language. –  Kos Jul 3 '12 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

The reason for the rule is that jumping over an initialization leaves the object in an undefined state. When you get to the end of the function, destroying those uninitialized objects might not work.

One exception is obviously that

int   i;

leaves the int uninitialized anyway, so skipping that is just half bad.

If you want to leave a function early, a quick return is an option to avoid the goto.

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You can't jump over initialization of an object.

size_t i = 0; 

is an initialization, while

size_t i;
i = 0;

is not. The C++ Standart says:

It is possible to transfer into a block, but not in a way that bypasses declarations with initialization. A program that jumps from a point where a local variable with automatic storage duration is not in scope to a point where it is in scope is ill-formed unless the variable has POD type (3.9) and is declared without an initializer.

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3  
Could you please explain why is there a different behavior when they are functionally equivalent? I mean what is the rationale behind this standard. –  Akshit Khurana Jul 3 '12 at 8:16
    
When you initialize a variable like this, it is still in scope even after the jump. That may cause big trouble if you will try to access it, and even more trouble in the end of the scope where it should be destroyed. If you have jumped over, the variable never existed, and trying to destroy it will result in a crash (probably segfault, I'm not sure). –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 3 '12 at 8:24
12  
The rationale is that in the int i; case, by defining the variable without an initializer, you are saying "I'm going to take responsibility to ensure that the variable is written before it gets read". The language lets you attempt that, and if the code following exit uses i, well, you failed. In the case of int i = 0;, the language enforces that any variable with an initializer is always initialized before use (as long as you don't use it in its own initializer, anyway). The only simple way the language can enforce that is to forbid your goto. –  Steve Jessop Jul 3 '12 at 8:33

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