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I am trying to implement a generic repository pattern. I found this site which I think its well explained. http://www.tugberkugurlu.com/archive/generic-repository-pattern-entity-framework-asp-net-mvc-and-unit-testing-triangle

My purpose is to save the developers some time and keystrokes and I know this will help me.

So I have 2 questions:
1. Is this a good approach or not, will I have some problems in the future?
2. How can I combine it with Unitofwork pattern?, I cant create an instance of the abstract class of course, so the following code its invalid.

public class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
    {
        #region Private fields
        private readonly MyCompanyContext _context = new MyCompanyContext();
        private GenericRepository<MyCompanyContext, Task> _taskRepository;

        public GenericRepository<MyCompanyContext, Task> TaskRepository
        {
            get
            {
                return _taskRepository ??
                         (_taskRepository = new GenericRepository<MyCompanyContext, Task>());
            }
        }




namespace MyCompany.DAL.Repository
{
    public interface IGenericRepository<T> where T : class
    {
        IQueryable<T> GetAll();
        IQueryable<T> FindBy(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate);
        void Add(T entity);
        void Delete(T entity);
        void Edit(T entity);
        void Save();
    }

    public abstract class GenericRepository<C, T> :
    IGenericRepository<T>
        where T : class
        where C : DbContext, new()
    {

        private C _entities = new C();
        public C Context
        {

            get { return _entities; }
            set { _entities = value; }
        }

        public virtual IQueryable<T> GetAll()
        {

            IQueryable<T> query = _entities.Set<T>();
            return query;
        }

        public IQueryable<T> FindBy(System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate)
        {
            IQueryable<T> query = _entities.Set<T>().Where(predicate);
            return query;
        }

        public virtual void Add(T entity)
        {
            _entities.Set<T>().Add(entity);
        }

        public virtual void Delete(T entity)
        {
            _entities.Set<T>().Remove(entity);
        }

        public virtual void Edit(T entity)
        {
            _entities.Entry(entity).State = System.Data.EntityState.Modified;
        }

        public virtual void Save()
        {
            _entities.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are several opinions regarding repositories, but after trying various repository implementations in production for couple years myself, I agree with Ayende's opinion, that repository, especially generic, is redundant abstraction layer.

I liked very much this course: http://www.pluralsight-training.net/microsoft/Courses/TableOfContents/linq-architecture

It walked through most possible solutions and explained goods and bads.

What we're using right now is very thin abstraction over datacontext, just to overcome Linq2Sql testability issues, which are irrelevant in most cases when using EF.

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With a lot of effort you might get that working, but I wonder if the effort is really worth it? I've seen implementations like this before, and they really struggle when attempting to manage many-to-many relationships (have a think about how you'd manage that in your scenario). You are using Entity Framework, an ORM right? ORMs like Entity Framework and nHibernate are designed to abstract the database implementation from application code, so what is the purpose of adding yet another abstraction above it to manage entities at such a granular level? If it's a question of testing, then you can use a mocking framework to mock the context, thus removing the need for an actual database during testing. If however, for architectural or security reasons you are seeking to remove interactions with a db context from your app code, I'd recommend for pragmatism using an implementation of the command pattern over the top of the entity framework. I've needed to do this on a larger scale enterprise (banking) application where for security reasons (rightly or wrongly) we were absolutely not allowed to have a db connection in our application code.

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I don tthink I am adding another layer of abstraction, I am just simplyfying my code to make it more easy to use. with the generic repository pattern I could do the CRUD in very efficient manner. But thats why I asked my 1st question in the first place, Would I have technical problems with this approach –  Esteban V Jul 3 '12 at 9:04
    
Yes, you're right, with UOW you're not really adding another layer of abstraction. I think though that except in very simple scenarios the UOW is not very useful, and yes, I think you might have technical problems if you have to manage any many-to-many relationships. –  Toby Couchman Jul 3 '12 at 9:09
    
@LuisEValencia> hm, I don't see how this simplifies your code? –  Giedrius Jul 3 '12 at 9:29
    
I dont need to write a repository for each entity. –  Esteban V Jul 3 '12 at 9:37
    
Yeah, but thing is that you may be don't need repository in first place :) There are several posts from ayende, but I recommend to read at least one - ayende.com/blog/3955/repository-is-the-new-singleton - don't necessarily need to think the same, but at least know alternative opinion. –  Giedrius Jul 3 '12 at 10:40

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