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I've a C# class library with overloaded methods, and one method has a ref parameter and the other has a value parameter. I can call these methods in C#, but I can't get it right in C++/CLI. It's seems compiler can't distinguish these two methods.

Here is my C# code

namespace test {
    public class test {
        public static void foo(int i)
        {
            i++;
        }
        public static void foo(ref int i)
        {
            i++;
        }
    }
}

and my C++/CLI code

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    int i=0;
    test::test::foo(i);     //error C2668: ambiguous call to overloaded function
    test::test::foo(%i);    //error C3071: operator '%' can only be applied to an instance of a ref class or a value-type
    int %r=i;
    test::test::foo(r);     //error C2668: ambiguous call to overloaded function
    Console::WriteLine(i);
    return 0;
}

I know in C++ I can't declare overload functions where the only difference in the function signature is that one takes an object and another takes reference to an object, but in C# I can.

Is this a feature supported in C# but not in C++/CLI? Is there any workaround?

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Do you have a sane realworld example of when this could be required? –  Jodrell Jul 3 '12 at 8:30
    
Did you tried it with a pointer instead of the variable? –  Aykut Çevik Jul 3 '12 at 8:32
    
Does this even build? if it does im intrigued too! +1 –  Nicholas King Jul 3 '12 at 8:38
    
@cevik: I tried int *p=&i; test::test::foo(*p); also get error C2668 –  czz Jul 3 '12 at 8:38
2  
@Nicholas King: In c#, you can. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/14akc2c7.aspx –  czz Jul 3 '12 at 8:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As a workaround you could build a C# helper class that you use in C++/CLI

namespace test
{
    public class testHelper
    {
        public static void fooByVal(int i)
        {
            test.foo(i);
        }

        public static void fooByRef(ref int i)
        {
            test.foo(ref i);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I found something helpful on Wikipedia:

C++/CLI uses a "^%" syntax to indicate a tracking reference to a handle. It is similar in concept to using "*&" (reference to a pointer) in Standard C++.

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