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Warning: Note that this is a dumb question of something that I would probably never solve in this manner. Hence the contradicting title. But since I have actually seen something similar in code I have gone through on a very large system I became intrigued. :)

Let's say we have a simplified class:

class Foo
{
  void a();
  virtual void b();
}

and then another class

class Bar : public Foo
{
  void a();
}

If a general part of the program handles all these classes as the base class of type Foo, how do I in the best manner call the "correct" version of function a within b? Since there is a possibility that the object is of type Bar. And say you, for legacy reasons, could not change the existing code and make the base class a function virtual etc.

What I did was to make a virtual in the base class and implement b within Bar since I had that option. But let's, for the sake of argument, say that this was impossible or disallowed. How "wrong" would it be to implement a workaround using something like this.

void b() {
  ...

  Bar* dabar;
  if((dabar = dynamic_cast<Bar*>(this)) != NULL) {
    dabar->a();
  }
  else {
    a();
  }
}

As I said, note that this is when dealing with base classes and wanting to call the function of a child class. Not the other way around.

share|improve this question
    
You derive from the method "a"? –  Mare Infinitus Jul 3 '12 at 8:32
    
Just edited that :)... My mistake ;) –  inquam Jul 3 '12 at 8:33
3  
It would work. What is it you're asking about? –  Kos Jul 3 '12 at 8:37
    
Why won't you just make "a" virtual? –  Mare Infinitus Jul 3 '12 at 8:41
    
Mare Infinitus: I did, but I just said for the sake of argument ;)... The people who did something like this when they did might not have known about virtual functions. I have no clue :)... My first reactions was, "why the hell did they do it like this" :P –  inquam Jul 3 '12 at 8:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there is a possibility to make your function virtual in the base class, this is the way to go, including the overhead of calling a different company to change there code, as this is clearly a design flaw.

If you do not have this possibility, for what reason whatsoever, your code will work, except when you want to derive from Bar. What do you think will happen, when you have a Bar* and call "a" on that.

Like:

Chair : public Bar {...}

Bar *bar = new Chair;
bar->a();
// what the heck?

And, of course, dynamic_cast will imply a serious disadvantage on performance.

Write clean code, write what you want to express, do not use tricks!

share|improve this answer
    
I agree completely ;) –  inquam Jul 3 '12 at 9:07

How "wrong" would it be to implement a workaround using something like this.

void b() {
  ...

  Bar* dabar;
  if((dabar = dynamic_cast<Bar*>(this)) != NULL) {
    dabar->a();
  }
  else {
    a();
  }
}

That would be an overkill. Simply calling a() in the virtual function does the trick.

#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:
    virtual int tryit()
    {
        return foo();
    }
private:
    int foo(){ return 1; }
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    virtual int tryit()
    {
        return foo();
    }

private:
    int foo(){ return 2; }
};

int main()
{
    Base *A =  new Derived();
    std::cout << std::endl << A->tryit();
}

output:

 2
share|improve this answer
    
...And say you, for legacy reasons, could not change the existing code and make the base class a() function virtual etc... –  iammilind Jul 3 '12 at 8:49
    
The foo() function is the non-virtual a() from the question example. tryit() is the virtual b() from the question example. –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 3 '12 at 8:50
    
Almost... But as mentioned they are all handled like the base class. So do a cast of B to it's base class Base before running the function. Then you will find that tryit() does not return 1 and 2 anymore. –  inquam Jul 3 '12 at 8:54
    
No, it still works this way. I've edited the main function, so it works with a base-class pointer now, check it. –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 3 '12 at 8:56
    
Ahh missed you added a secondary virtual implementation of tryit() to Derived. –  inquam Jul 12 '12 at 12:53

How "wrong" would it be to implement a workaround using something like this.

Theoretically you are not doing anything wrong. It's a well defined behavior.

Just that, it's not a good practice to follow. It makes code messy and confusing.
Moreover, it will be unmanageable if bar derived to some other child class in future.

share|improve this answer
    
If the a() function (in this case) is not public, that's not too bad, I would say. However, I agree that it would be better if it was virtual. –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 3 '12 at 8:43
    
@SingerOfTheFall,, OP already mentions that Foo::a() cannot be made virtual for some reasons. –  iammilind Jul 3 '12 at 8:50
    
That's why I'm saying "it would be better if it was..." instead of "for the sake of all cute kittens, you should change your code and make it...". –  SingerOfTheFall Jul 3 '12 at 8:54

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