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I have functions of the following form in the code I'm refactoring:

A f()
{
    if(existing)
        return A();
    else
        return A(handle);
}

The Safe Bool Idiom is later used to test if A is associated with a handle or not, i.e. if we should call the class methods for this object which require internally a valid handle for execution. A's methods are const.

I'd like to return an interface, IA, here instead. Must I therefore return a pointer? If so I will go with boost shared pointers. I can test if the pointer is pointing to something or not.

Is there any way for me to work with references here instead? Would you recommend such an approach or do you think that boost::shared_ptrs is the way to go?

UPDATE

A is derived from IA.

My compiler is gcc version 4.4.3.

My biggest problem with this code is that A is used to interact with an external C API. Therefore I wish to mock it away using the IA interface as base for my Mock of A and its implementation, A. Then outside of the method f() above, which I see as a factory, I will only work with IA pointers. Dependency Injection in other words.

So A is basically a handle and an interface to a set of C API functions which require a handle. I can have several objects of type A where the interface is the same but the handle is different.

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3  
I'll probably get shot down for this, but if you don't have access to the new std::unique_ptr, I would even go with std::auto_ptr (with lot's of disclaimers) - references won't work as you'll be returning a reference to a local... –  Nim Jul 3 '12 at 8:39
1  
I don't know what your A should do with the handle, but the whole idea seems a terrible over-complication, both in code complexity and runtime imlpications. –  valdo Jul 3 '12 at 8:39

5 Answers 5

I'd return a std::unique_ptr< AI > object :

std::unique_ptr< AI > f()
{
    if(existing)
        return std::unique_ptr< AI >( new A() );
    else
        return std::unique_ptr< AI >( new A(handle) );
}

In the above case, the slicing doesn't happen, and the compiler will move* the object.

* I assumed you are using the c++11.


Since you are not using c++11, the simplest is to use boost::shared_ptrs :

boost::shared_ptrs< AI > f()
{
    if(existing)
        return boost::shared_ptrs< AI >( new A() );
    else
        return boost::shared_ptrs< AI >( new A(handle) );
}

In such case, you do not have to take care whether and when the created object gets destructed. The boost::shared_ptrs will take care of that.

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I'm not using c++11. My compiler version is gcc 4.4.3. –  Baz Jul 3 '12 at 10:12
    
@Baz: 4.4.3 still has some C++11 support, including rvalue references- the necessary feature for std::unique_ptr to work. –  Puppy Jul 3 '12 at 10:18
    
@DeadMG But, is std::unique_ptr available for gcc 4.4.3? –  BЈовић Jul 3 '12 at 10:21
    
No idea. Who cares? If it isn't, you can just roll a quick one yourself. –  Puppy Jul 3 '12 at 10:21
    
@BЈовић I can comile using gcc 4.3.2 on the command line when using std::unique_ptr, however eclipse isn't happy. I'll have to look further into what this issue is. –  Baz Jul 3 '12 at 11:03

I'd go with pointers too, but you can also work with references:

A& f()
{
    if(existing)
    {
        static A a;
        return a;
    }
    else
    {
        static A a(handle);
        return a;
    }
}

You are fully aware of the implications though, right? i.e. you can't re-assign the reference and modifying it means modifying the local static variable.

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Who told you that just one instance of A is what's needed? –  valdo Jul 3 '12 at 8:40
3  
@valdo did you read the whole question? - "Is there any way for me to work with references here instead?" I was answering this. I already told him the implications and that I would use pointers. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 3 '12 at 8:56
    
I've updated my OP to clarify this. –  Baz Jul 3 '12 at 10:17

From your code snippet it seems that you are constructing A objects in function f. In such a case, returning the object by value is probably the best thing you can do. The compiler will use return value optimization (RVO) and optimize all the copies away.

Check this article by Dave Abrahams on passing and returning objects by value.

Be aware that this solution will not work if you are returning a base class of A, due to the slicing problem. If returning an A object is fine, then this is probably the best solution.

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@BЈовић So far, from the OP example does not look as if there are derived classes. It is actually not clear what IA is, or whether it is actually needed. –  betabandido Jul 3 '12 at 8:50
    
I don't thik I should return by value since I wish to use an interface. –  Baz Jul 3 '12 at 10:13

If you can understand pointers then work with pointers. If you can't, then stay with what you've got. Looks like the guy before you did his best to avoid pointers. As betabandido said, the compiler will make best out of it, even if it seems slow - on paper.

Interface is a design pattern to take fullest advantage of pointers. It doesn't make very much sense without pointers and casting.

To test if the pointer is pointing at something or not, there is NULL value. No need to roll out cannons if you're shooting flies.

Explain why you're not comfortable with the code as it is now. Maybe the problem isn't really severe.

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I've added some extra details to my OP. –  Baz Jul 3 '12 at 10:14
    
@Baz Sorry, I still don't understand. So A is a wrapper class for a handle and C API? And you're trying to substitute those C API for testing? If you have full control over A then it can behave differently depending on some member variable, no need for interfaces and pointers (but messy code). Or use #defines to replace A with ADebug for entire project. –  Agent_L Jul 3 '12 at 10:30

Returning a pointer is one way to go.

To me, another simple and native way is to add a return value to the method's signature.

int f(A & a)
{
    if(existing)
    {
        return ERROR_ALREADY_EXISTS;
    }
    else
    {
        A temp(handle);
        a = temp;
        return SUCCEEDED;
    }
}
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