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Consider this simple AS3 class.

package
{
     import flash.display.Sprite;
     import flash.display.MovieClip;

     public class MySprite extends Sprite
     {
         private var someMC:MovieClip = new MovieClip();

         public function MySprite()
         {
              super();

              addChild(someMC);
         }
     }
}

And this one:

package
{
     import flash.display.Sprite;
     import flash.display.MovieClip;

     public class MySprite extends Sprite
     {
         private var someMC:MovieClip;

         public function MySprite()
         {
              super();

              someMC = new MovieClip();
              addChild(someMC);
         }
     }
}

Is this the same thing, or is there more to it?

I guess its because in the first example, the MovieClip seems to exist before the contructor is called (when does this occur, what is the benefit or not?).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's all the same. The compiler translates your first example into the second. The only difference is that you can control instantiation order when you put the assignment into the constructor.

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Thanks very much for your fast reply! –  user1059939 Jul 3 '12 at 8:56

Actionscript is a fairly high-level language that, so long as you don't piss off it's garbage collection, tends to be pretty chill with most of the things you can throw at it. Having said that, even lower level languages tend not to care which way you do it, so it really comes down to a question of style.

Personally, I try to only initialize constants and variables that I want to tweak the initial values of often above the constructor; that way they're easily found and changed, and not muddled up by a whole lot of new this and () that.

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Thanks Sandy. I tend to avoid the first example at all costs but like you said, there is times it is cleaner to look at. Having these niggling doubts about differences (or how it worked) has always annoyed me. –  user1059939 Jul 3 '12 at 8:58
    
I'm in the same boat –  Sandy Gifford Jul 3 '12 at 9:08

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