Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The query returns no results even on the ones where it does work and I am getting the following error.

The datediff function resulted in an overflow. The number of dateparts separating two date/time instances is too large. Try to use datediff with a less precise datepart.

But there is nothing to overflow

The following work:

SELECT cis.SaleBK   
FROM dbo.Sales cis
INNER JOIN dim.CalendarDate sd on cis.SaleDateFK = sd.CalendarDatePK
WHERE sd.CalendarDate >= DATEADD(day,-1,dbo.DateToday())

And this one:

SELECT cis.SaleBK
       ,DATEDIFF(s,'1969-01-01',sd.CalendarDate) as SortOrder
FROM dbo.Sales cis
INNER JOIN dim.CalendarDate sd on cis.SaleDateFK = sd.CalendarDatePK
WHERE sd.CalendarDate = DATEADD(day,-1,dbo.DateToday())

But this does not and I can't figure out why

SELECT cis.SaleBK
       ,DATEDIFF(s,'1969-01-01',sd.CalendarDate) as SortOrder
FROM dbo.Sales cis
INNER JOIN dim.CalendarDate sd on cis.SaleDateFK = sd.CalendarDatePK
WHERE sd.CalendarDate >= DATEADD(day,-1,dbo.DateToday())
share|improve this question
    
Do you have any CalendarDate values more than ~24 years in the future? If so, the number of seconds since 1969 is more than DATEDIFF can return. Also, why dbo.DateToday()? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 3 '12 at 8:57
    
Ah it's just a small function on my db that we use instead of getdate, returns the getdate without the time. In this case it doesn't serve any real purpose however I use it out of habit. –  morpheusdreams Jul 3 '12 at 9:06
    
Also, yes CalendarDate goes up to 2050 but it's keyed on the Sales table which only has sales up to yesterday so surely it shouldn't be doing datediff on anything? –  morpheusdreams Jul 3 '12 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wrote a loop to check when datediff returns an error:

; with  Dates as
        (
        select  cast('2012-01-01' as date) as dt
        union all
        select  dateadd(day, 1, dt)
        from    Dates
        )
select  dt
,       DATEDIFF(s,'1969-01-01',dt)
from    Dates
option  (maxrecursion 0)

The number of seconds since 1969-01-01 and 2037-01-20 is the first that is too large.

So it looks like the maximum number returned by DateDiff is 2^31 or 2147483647.

You can avoid the error by limiting the query's date range, like:

WHERE  sd.CalendarDate >= DATEADD(day,-1,dbo.DateToday())
       and sd.CalendarDate < '2037-01-20'
share|improve this answer
    
Wow that works, however I don't understand why it was trying to do the datediff when the query returns no results. –  morpheusdreams Jul 3 '12 at 8:58
    
SQL Server might evaluate the select BEFORE applying the where clause. I've had that happen with division-by-zero errors too, not sure exactly when this behavior is allowed. –  Andomar Jul 3 '12 at 9:05
    
But surely it couldn't evaluate anything in the CalendarDate table which isn't linked to the Sales table? As there are no Sales after yesterday so it should never even see those values in CalendarDate? –  morpheusdreams Jul 3 '12 at 9:09
    
It might retrieve all the rows from CalendarDate, calculate the datediff, then run the where clause, and only later join them to Sales. –  Andomar Jul 3 '12 at 9:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.