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I have a product table which as many columns. Primary key is productid. There 50,000 rows but when I issue a select statement like select * from products then it is taking 10 minutes to get the full data. So advise me what to do as a result I can run my query faster.

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1  
Select fewer columns. –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 9:23
    
how many fields are there, and what type ? * is often too many columns returned. and... if one one of them happened to be an IMAGE, BLOB - then it could be your hotspots. –  YS. Jul 3 '12 at 9:23
    
Do you actually need all the rows and all the columns in one select statement? Decide what you actually want to select and what you want to filter on, and create relevant indexes to those columns you reference in your final select statement. –  Bridge Jul 3 '12 at 9:23
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How many columns? What kind of columns? Are there any blog field? Selecting only a subset of the columns has better performance? –  ADC Jul 3 '12 at 9:25
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@TomTom It's probably a combination of issues, but we'll never know without clarification from OP :-) –  Bridge Jul 3 '12 at 9:38

3 Answers 3

Is your primary key also the clustering key on that table?

If you do a SELECT * .... you'll basically always get a full table scan. There's really nothing that can speed that query up - you want all rows, all columns - so you get it all and it takes the time it takes.

If you do more "focused" queries like

SELECT col1, col2 FROM dbo.Products WHERE SomeColumn = 42

then you have a chance of speeding this up by using the appropriate indices.

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Sorry, 50.000 rows in a table and 10 minutes - even with zero index it should not take 10 minutes. Get real - this is not a bad index, at least ALONE. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 9:26
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@TomTom You don't know what types the columns are - if there are blobs etc. it might take that long. –  Bridge Jul 3 '12 at 9:27
    
Which my answer actually says - but this is unlikely especially as normally a Select * from fields does not transfer blob data, sorry. Blob data needs to be read explicitly. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 9:29
    
yes there is image field. but if i write query like select title,OERef,VMRef from product then it is also taking 3 minute. product id field is pk here. my db is on another machine which i am accessing over the internet.....may be this could be the reason? i am confuse is there any good way out?? –  Thomas Jul 3 '12 at 10:27

Buy a better computer.

Seriously.

SQL Server 2000 has been retired years ago, so this is an OLD install. 50.000 products is a joke - any table below 1 million is nothing.

But when i issue a select statement like select * from products then it is taking 10 minute to get the full data.

Assuming this is over LAN, not over a slow internet connection, there can be 2 reasons for that:

  • System is TERRIBLY OVERLOADED. Like SERIOUS overloaded. Not like I have not seen that on old setups. Been there, seen that - hard discs so overloaded (hey, they are SCSI, they are fast) that they took more than 2 seconds to answer to a request.
  • System is programmed by incompetents. Could be bad transaction level handling leading to terrible locks for long duration which block you. This is possible, but then you are in for a LOT of rework to get the ridiculous code out of the programming.

A select * from table should not take more than a couple of seconds to transfer all the data over LAN. Point. Unless the bale has tons of binary data (i.e. HUGH amounts of data in some fields).

As your local database specialist to make an analysis. Start with hardware load then move to locking behavior. Consider upgrading to a technology that is more modern, By now you are a LOT of generations behind.

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3  
" 50.000 products is a joke - any table below 1 million is nothing." I'd say this depends on the number (and size) of columns. –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 9:26
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I say no. Seriously. This is like saying "ok, a small box does not weight A LOT" and yo uay "depends what you put in" when "a lot" starts being 100 tons. Unless you have binary / text fields with hundreds of megabytes each it does NOT depends on the number of columns. They may make the difference between 0.05 and 0.5 seconds, but not between 0.05 seconds and 10 minutes. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 9:28
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If a table (or clustered index) scan is the only thing that happens (which should be the case when selecting from a table without a filter applied), the running time depends largely on the speed at which data can be passed on. One option is to increase this speed (network speed, disk speed etc.), the other option is to reduce the amount of data that needs to be transferred (i.e. reduce the number of columns). I agree with you that the analysis of a database specialist is the right thing to do. –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 10:00
    
Yes, but 50.000 rows even with 8kb PER ROW do NOT take 10 minutes to load. Get that. THis is way aboeve that. You aer off by a factor of 50 to 100. Even with 8kp per row it should not run 10 minutes. Plus he does not say this is the only thing. It is NOT related to data amount per se. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 10:08
    
yes there is image field. but if i write query like select title,OERef,VMRef from product then it is also taking 3 minute. product id field is pk here. my db is on another machine which i am accessing over the internet.....may be this could be the reason? i am confuse is there any good way out?? –  Thomas Jul 3 '12 at 10:27

Because there's no criterium (WHERE), the time your query takes is not due to the selection (determining which rows to select) but most likely due to the sheer size of the data.

The only solution is:

Do not use SELECT *, but select only the columns you need.

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2  
Sheer size? Sorry, the amount of stuff you try to transport in your car is too large. No way to pack in - a small box? 50.000 rows is something I table scan in 0.x seconds on a modern computer. This is not a SIZE Issue per se. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 9:26
    
Given a certain environment (computer, SQL Server 2000 install, unfiltered query), reducing the size of the data is the only way to reduce running time. Tuning the environment is also an option, but IMHO not directly a solution that falls within the range of a SQL developer. –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 9:30
    
Did you EVER use a SQL Server from soneone else? It may well be that the server is overloaded because something else uses all IOPS - been there, seen that, some idiot did not know what an index is. The reason it is slow may be totally unrelated to the size of the data in this query. It could even be a bad hard disc (seen that too). If that is a "developer machine, only one user, modern computer", yes, but given the information - could be a dozen things, including a broken SCSI terminator (and yes, SQL 2000 is from a time people used SCSI still). –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 9:32
    
Yes, I'd consider the brokenness of a machine. Still, I don't see why 'buying a better computer' is a good solution given an old (legacy?) environment of SQL Server 2000 when all that is looked for is a way to speed up a 'SELECT *' query. –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 9:38
    
(Why the downvotes? Is this 'dangerously wrong', an 'extreme case' or 'no-effort-expended'?) –  vstrien Jul 3 '12 at 9:49

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