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I am trying to delay an AJAX request so that it is sent out 2-3 seconds after the LAST keyup of an input cell.
So far I have managed to delay the requests, but after 2-3 seconds I get one request sent for every keyup in the field...
How can I make jQuery cancel the first ones and just send the last keyup?
Here's the code so far:

$('#lastname').focus(function(){
          $('.terms :input').val(""); //clears other search fields
}).keyup(function(){
    caps(this); //another function that capitalizes the field
    $type = $(this).attr("id"); // just passing the type of desired search to the php file
        setTimeout(function(){ // setting the delay for each keypress
                ajaxSearchRequest($type); //runs the ajax request

        }, 1000);
});

This code above, waits 1 sec then sends 4-5 AJAX requests depending on keypresses. I just want one sent after the last keyup
I have found some similar solutions in StackOverflow that use Javascript, but I have not been able to implement them to my project due to my small knowledge of programming.

[SOLVED] Final working code, thanks to @Dr.Molle:

$('#lastname').focus(function(){
          $('.terms :input').val("");
}).keyup(function(){
    caps(this);
    $type = $(this).attr("id");

    window.timer=setTimeout(function(){ // setting the delay for each keypress
            ajaxSearchRequest($type); //runs the ajax request

        }, 3000);

}).keydown(function(){clearTimeout(window.timer);});

Here's the ajaxSearchRequest code:

function ajaxSearchRequest($type){
                var ajaxRequest2;  // The variable that makes Ajax possible!

                try{
                  // Opera 8.0+, Firefox, Safari
                  ajaxRequest2 = new XMLHttpRequest();
                }catch (e){
                  // Internet Explorer Browsers
                  try{
                     ajaxRequest2 = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
                  }catch (e) {
                     try{
                    ajaxRequest2 = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
                     }catch (e){
                    // Something went wrong
                    alert("Browser error!");
                    return false;
                     }
                  }
                }

                ajaxRequest2.onreadystatechange = function(){
                  if(ajaxRequest2.readyState == 4){

                        $result = ajaxRequest2.responseText;
                        $('#resultcontainer').html($result);

                    }}


                var searchterm = document.getElementById($type).value;


                var queryString ="?searchterm=" + searchterm +"&type=" +$type;


                if(searchterm !== ""){

                ajaxRequest2.open("GET", "searchrequest.php" + 
                                 queryString, true);
                ajaxRequest2.send(null);
                }
        }
share|improve this question
    
post the code of ajaxSearchRequest –  Imdad Jul 3 '12 at 9:53
    
@Imdad why is that necessary? You can already see each keyup making a new timeout without cancelling previous ones. –  Esailija Jul 3 '12 at 9:54
    
There is other work around. I can only tell if I know what the function is –  Imdad Jul 3 '12 at 9:55
    
is there a way to cancel the delay'ed event on .keydown? so if there is no further keydown the keyup event will actually happen? –  krasatos Jul 3 '12 at 9:56
3  
@krasatos the solution is to simply cancel previous (.clearTimeout) timeouts when you set a new timeout. Then the last keyup timeout won't get cancelled. –  Esailija Jul 3 '12 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

store the timeout in a variable, so you will be able to clear recent timeouts:

clearTimeout(window.timer);
window.timer=setTimeout(function(){ // setting the delay for each keypress
                ajaxSearchRequest($type); //runs the ajax request

        }, 3000);
share|improve this answer
    
I'll give you a +1 when you do it without storing that value in a global variable... –  Alnitak Jul 3 '12 at 10:01
    
Where would you store it? –  Dr.Molle Jul 3 '12 at 10:02
    
you could use a closure. –  Christoph Jul 3 '12 at 10:03
1  
thanx a lot, it worked, here's the final code: ` $('#lastname').focus(function(){ $('.terms :input').val(""); }).keyup(function(){ caps(this); $type = $(this).attr("id"); window.timer=setTimeout(function(){ // setting the delay for each keypress ajaxSearchRequest($type); //runs the ajax request }, 3000); }).keydown(function(){clearTimeout(window.timer);});` –  krasatos Jul 3 '12 at 10:04
4  
ffs it's example code. It doesn't need a closure for the solution to be apparent. –  Erik Reppen Jul 3 '12 at 13:47

What you are trying to do is called debouncing.

Here's a jquery plugin by Ben Alman that does the job.

And underscore.js includes this functionality as well.

There's really no need to hack the ajax request system. Just make sure it's called at the right moment.

share|improve this answer
    
ill check it, thanx –  krasatos Jul 3 '12 at 18:44

I like the Molle's answer But I would to further improve the performance

var ajaxRequest2;  // The variable that makes Ajax possible!
function getAjaxObject()
{
                try{
                  // Opera 8.0+, Firefox, Safari
                  ajaxRequest2 = new XMLHttpRequest();
                }catch (e){
                  // Internet Explorer Browsers
                  try{
                     ajaxRequest2 = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
                  }catch (e) {
                     try{
                    ajaxRequest2 = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
                     }catch (e){
                    // Something went wrong
                    alert("Browser error!");
                   // return false;
                     }
                  }
                }
  return ajaxRequest2;


 }
   getAjaxObject();

    function ajaxSearchRequest($type){



               if(typeof ajaxRequest2 =="undefined" || ajaxRequest2 == false)
                {
                  return;
                }
               ajaxRequest2.abort();

                ajaxRequest2.onreadystatechange = function(){
                  if(ajaxRequest2.readyState == 4){

                        $result = ajaxRequest2.responseText;
                        $('#resultcontainer').html($result);

                    }}


                var searchterm = document.getElementById($type).value;


                var queryString ="?searchterm=" + searchterm +"&type=" +$type;


                if(searchterm !== ""){

                ajaxRequest2.open("GET", "searchrequest.php" + 
                                 queryString, true);
                ajaxRequest2.send(null);
                }
        }

This change will abort an on going ajax request and send a fresh request. It is helpful when you

Typed-> waited 4 sec ->request sent ->typed again (response not received) ->waited 4 second->another request fires

share|improve this answer
    
May I know why it is downvoted? –  Imdad Jul 3 '12 at 10:13
    
because it's a bad answer? Aborting requests don't help - servers (usually) keep processing queries. The right fix is not to keep sending requests. –  Alnitak Jul 3 '12 at 10:14
    
But, it lessens network overhead. And resolves problem of getting multiple responses if you are bit slow in typing. –  Imdad Jul 3 '12 at 10:16
3  
no, not sending the requests "lessens network overhead". Cancelling an AJAX request just stops the eventual answer from reaching the callback. –  Alnitak Jul 3 '12 at 10:19
    
I appreciate any citation to back your argument that "aborting does not lessens network overhead and just stops the data to be received to the callback" –  Imdad Jul 3 '12 at 10:21

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