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I have a function that returns two values in a list. Both values need to be added to a data.table in two new columns. Evaluation of the function is costly, so I would like to avoid having to compute the function twice. Here's the example:

library(data.table)
example(data.table)
DT
   x y  v
1: a 1 42
2: a 3 42
3: a 6 42
4: b 1  4
5: b 3  5
6: b 6  6
7: c 1  7
8: c 3  8
9: c 6  9

Here's an example of my function. Remember I said it's costly compute, on top of that there is no way to deduce one return value from the other given values (as in the example below):

myfun <- function (y, v) 
{
ret1 = y + v
ret2 = y - v
return(list(r1 = ret1, r2 = ret2))
}

Here's my way to add two columns in one statement. That one needs to call myfun twice, however:

DT[,new1:=myfun(y,v)$r1][,new2:=myfun(y,v)$r2]

   x y  v new1 new2
1: a 1 42   43  -41
2: a 3 42   45  -39
3: a 6 42   48  -36
4: b 1  4    5   -3
5: b 3  5    8   -2
6: b 6  6   12    0
7: c 1  7    8   -6
8: c 3  8   11   -5
9: c 6  9   15   -3

Any suggestions on how to do this? I could save r2 in a separate environment each time I call myfun, I just need a way to add two columns by reference at a time.

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Why not have your function take in a data frame and return a data frame directly? `myfun <- function (y, v) { ret1 = y + v ret2 = y - v return(list(r1 = ret1, r2 = ret2)) } –  Etienne Low-Décarie Jul 4 '12 at 18:55
    
@Etienne Because that copies the inputs to create a new output. Florian is using data.table for its memory efficiency with large datasets; it doesn't copy x,y or v at all, even once. Think 20GB datasets in RAM. –  Matt Dowle Jul 5 '12 at 8:58
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2 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You could store the output of your function call:

z <- myfun(DT$y,DT$v)
head(DT[,new1:=z$r1][,new2:=z$r2])
#      x y  v new1 new2
# [1,] a 1 42   43  -41
# [2,] a 3 42   45  -39
# [3,] a 6 42   48  -36
# [4,] b 1  4    5   -3
# [5,] b 3  5    8   -2
# [6,] b 6  6   12    0

but this also seems to works:

DT[, c("new1","new2") := myfun(y,v), with = FALSE]

New in data.table v1.8.3 on R-Forge, the with = FALSE is no longer needed here, for convenience :

DT[, c("new1","new2") := myfun(y,v)]

Up to the minute live NEWS is here.

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wow, that second one is amazing, thanks! just ran it with debug(myfun) to see how often it gets called: it's once. great. –  Florian Oswald Jul 3 '12 at 10:33
1  
+10 from me too. I've just raised FR#2120 to "Drop needing with=FALSE for LHS of :=" –  Matt Dowle Jul 3 '12 at 10:44
4  
Note that list recycling is also done; e.g., c("a","b","c","d"):=list(1,2) puts 1 into a and c, and 2 into b and d. If any of the columns don't exist they'll be added by reference. Not sure how useful := recycling is in practice. It's more for c("a","b","c"):=NULL which deletes those 3 columns. Internally that's a recycle of NULL to a (semantic) list length 3. –  Matt Dowle Jul 3 '12 at 10:49
    
@MatthewDowle oh yes, just wanted to ask that. the c("a","b","c"):=NULL is very useful. –  Florian Oswald Jul 3 '12 at 12:38
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Why not have your function take in a data frame and return a data frame directly?

myfun <- function (DT) 
{
DT$ret1 = with(DT, y + v)
DT$ret2 = with(DT, y - v)
return(DT)
}
share|improve this answer
10  
Because that copies the whole of DT, twice. Florian is using data.table for its memory efficiency with large datasets; it doesn't copy x,y or v at all, even once. –  Matt Dowle Jul 5 '12 at 8:55
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