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I have 2 php files.

index.php:

<?php
    $counter = 0;
    require_once('temp.php');
    temp();
    echo $counter;
?>

temp.php:

<?php
    function temp() {
            tempHelper();
    }
    function tempHelper() {
            $counter++;
    }
?>

I want to print 1 not 0. I tried to set $counter as global variable without success.

What can I do?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your tempHelper function is incrementing a local $counter variable, not the global one. You have to either pass the variable in by reference through both functions, or use the global variable:

function tempHelper() {
  global $counter;
  $counter++;
}

Note that dependence on global variables likely indicates a design flaw in your application.

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Faster than me :) Here is a link php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php –  Bondye Jul 3 '12 at 11:02
    
There is not way to set in the initalization of $counter to make him global? –  Nir Jul 3 '12 at 11:04
    
In PHP, there is no way to make user defined super globals. If you are wanting to do this though, reconsider your application design. –  Cameron Martin Jul 3 '12 at 11:06
    
Thanks you!!!!! –  Nir Jul 3 '12 at 11:08
1  
I hope you do not ignore all the people advising you not to do this. You shouldn't be using global variables unless you fully understand why they are bad and make a conscious decision to use them anyways. –  meagar Jul 3 '12 at 11:09
show 2 more comments

I would advise against using global variables. Using a class for your counter would probably be better.

class Counter {
    public $counter;

    public function __construct($initial=0) {
        $this->counter = $initial;
    }

    public function increment() {
        $this->counter++;
    }

}

Or just use a variable without a function. Your function seems redundant, since it would be just as easy to type $counter++ than it would the function name.

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I suppose this should work:

<?php
    $counter = 0;

    function temp() {
            // global $counter; [edited, no need for that line]
            tempHelper();
    }
    function tempHelper() {
            global $counter;
            $counter++;
    }

    temp();
    echo $counter;
?>

Or you can pass the variable as an argument or return new value from that function.

More info at http://www.simplemachines.org/community/index.php?topic=1602.0

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There is no reason to declare global $counter inside temp, which doesn't use it. –  meagar Jul 3 '12 at 11:09
    
I just realized it now. Thanks. –  Hynek Zatloukal Jul 3 '12 at 11:11
    
The temp function seems redundant. –  Cameron Martin Jul 3 '12 at 13:11
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