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I'd like to use the NIO to send/receive data to/from a distant machine. I can send or receive data at any time, when i need to send data i just send it without any queries from the distant machine, and the distant machine send me data at regular interval. I don't understand the NIO mechanism. What generates and read or write event on the Selector SelectionKey ? Is it possible to use only one ServerSocketChannel on my side, to read data from the distant machine et to write data to it ? That is what i understand but i don't see how the writing event can be triggered... Thank you for your explanation.

I already did some coding and i can read data coming in from the distant machine, but cannot write. I use Selector and i don't know how can i write data. The logged message "handle write" is never written, but in wireshark i can see my packet.

    public class ServerSelector {

    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(ServerSelector.class.getName());
    private static final int TIMEOUT = 3000; // Wait timeout (milliseconds)
    private static final int MAXTRIES = 3;
    private final Selector selector;

    public ServerSelector(Controller controller, int... servPorts) throws IOException {
        if (servPorts.length <= 0) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Parameter(s) : <Port>...");
        }
        Handler consolehHandler = new ConsoleHandler();
        consolehHandler.setLevel(Level.INFO);
        logger.addHandler(consolehHandler);

        // Create a selector to multiplex listening sockets and connections
        selector = Selector.open();

        // Create listening socket channel for each port and register selector
        for (int servPort : servPorts) {
            ServerSocketChannel listnChannel = ServerSocketChannel.open();
            listnChannel.socket().bind(new InetSocketAddress(servPort));

            listnChannel.configureBlocking(false); // must be nonblocking to register
            // Register selector with channel.  The returned key is ignored
            listnChannel.register(selector, SelectionKey.OP_ACCEPT);
        }

        // Create a handler that will implement the protocol
        IOProtocol protocol = new IOProtocol();

        int tries = 0;
        // Run forever, processing available I/O operations
        while (tries < MAXTRIES) {
            // Wait for some channel to be ready (or timeout)
            if (selector.select(TIMEOUT) == 0) { // returns # of ready chans
                System.out.println(".");
                tries += 1;
                continue;
            }

            // Get iterator on set of keys with I/O to process
            Iterator<SelectionKey> keyIter = selector.selectedKeys().iterator();
            while (keyIter.hasNext()) {
                SelectionKey key = keyIter.next(); // Key is a bit mask
                // Server socket channel has pending connection requests?
                if (key.isAcceptable()) {
                    logger.log(Level.INFO, "handle accept");
                    protocol.handleAccept(key, controller);
                }

                // Client socket channel has pending data?
                if (key.isReadable()) {
                    logger.log(Level.INFO, "handle read");
                    protocol.handleRead(key);
                }

                // Client socket channel is available for writing and
                // key is valid (i.e., channel not closed) ?
                if (key.isValid() && key.isWritable()) {
                    logger.log(Level.INFO, "handle write");
                    protocol.handleWrite(key);
                }
                keyIter.remove(); // remove from set of selected keys
                tries = 0;
            }
        }
    }
}

The protocol

    public class IOProtocol implements Protocol {

    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(IOProtocol.class.getName());

    IOProtocol() {
        Handler consolehHandler = new ConsoleHandler();
        consolehHandler.setLevel(Level.INFO);
        logger.addHandler(consolehHandler);
    }

    /**
     *
     * @param key
     * @throws IOException
     */
    @Override
    public void handleAccept(SelectionKey key, Controller controller) throws IOException {
        SocketChannel clntChan = ((ServerSocketChannel) key.channel()).accept();
        clntChan.configureBlocking(false); // Must be nonblocking to register
        controller.setCommChannel(clntChan);
        // Register the selector with new channel for read and attach byte buffer
        SelectionKey socketKey = clntChan.register(key.selector(), SelectionKey.OP_READ | SelectionKey.OP_WRITE, controller);
    }

    /**
     * Client socket channel has pending data
     *
     * @param key
     * @throws IOException
     */
    @Override
    public void handleRead(SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
        Controller ctrller = (Controller)key.attachment();
        try {
            ctrller.readData();
        } catch (CommandUnknownException ex) {
            logger.log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        }
        key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_READ | SelectionKey.OP_WRITE);
    }

    /**
     * Channel is available for writing, and key is valid (i.e., client channel
     * not closed).
     *
     * @param key
     * @throws IOException
     */
    @Override
    public void handleWrite(SelectionKey key) throws IOException {

        Controller ctrl = (Controller)key.attachment();
        ctrl.writePendingData();
        if (!buf.hasRemaining()) { // Buffer completely written ?
            // Nothing left, so no longer interested in writes
            key.interestOps(SelectionKey.OP_READ);
        }
    buf.compact();
    }
}

The controller

    /**
     * Fill buffer with data.
     * @param msg The data to be sent
     * @throws IOException 
     */
    private void writeData(AbstractMsg msg) throws IOException {
//        
        writeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(msg.getSize() + 4);
        writeBuffer.putInt(msg.getSize());
        msg.writeHeader(writeBuffer);
        msg.writeData(writeBuffer);
        logger.log(Level.INFO, "Write data - message size : {0}", new Object[]{msg.getSize()});
        logger.log(Level.INFO, "Write data - message : {0}", new Object[]{msg});
    }

    /**
     * Write to the SocketChannel
     * @throws IOException 
     */
    public void writePendingData() throws IOException {
        commChannel.write(writeBuffer);
    }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

ServerSocketChannel is used to make a connection, but not send data. You need one ServerSocketChannel and one SocketChannel per each connection.

Examples of reading and writing using SocketChannel:

ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(48);
int bytesRead = socketChannel.read(buf);

Your program will sleep at second line until data will come. You need to put this code in infinite loop and run it in background Thread. When data came you can process it from this thread, then wait for another data to come.

ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(48);
buf.clear();
buf.put("Hello!".getBytes());

buf.flip();

while(buf.hasRemaining()) {
    channel.write(buf);
}

There is no blocking methods, so if you sending small byte buffer you can call this from your main Thread.

Source

ADD: Don't set OP_WRITE key on new connection. Only OP_READ. When you want to write some data you need to notify selector that you want to send something and send it in events loop. Good solution is to make a Queue of outcoming messages. Then follow this steps:

  • adding data to Queue
  • setting OP_WRITE to channel's key
  • in while (keyIter.hasNext()) loop you'll have writable key, write all data from queue and remove OP_WRITE key.

It's hard for me to understand your code, but I think you'll find out what's the problem. Also if you want to have only one connection there is no need to use Selector. And this is weird that you binding few ServerSocketChannels.

share|improve this answer
    
I posted some code –  jerome Jul 3 '12 at 12:16
    
edited my answer –  alaster Jul 3 '12 at 12:33
    
These methods are all blocking unless you put the channel into non-blocking mode. It is not necessary to 'notify the selector that you want to send something'. There is no necessity for a Queue of outgoing messages. Too inaccurate. -1. –  EJP Jul 3 '12 at 12:53
    
@EJP What is your solution? If I write to SocketChannel from non-event loop, method write will block until selector.select() return. I thought that the right way to send data is doing it on getting writable key. –  alaster Jul 3 '12 at 13:01
    
When I said that method is non-blocking, I meant that there is no need to use another thread to write data, write method releases block quickly for small buffer when read can sleep for long period –  alaster Jul 3 '12 at 13:07

I would suggest you use blocking NIO (which is the default behaviour for SocketChannel) You don't need to use a Selector but you can use one thread for reading and another for writing.


Based on your example.

private final ByteBuffer writeBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(1024*1024);

private void writeData(AbstractMsg msg) {
    writeBuffer.clear();
    writeBuffer.putInt(0); // set later
    msg.writeHeader(writeBuffer);
    msg.writeData(writeBuffer);
    writeBuffer.putInt(0, writeBuffer.position());

    writeBuffer.flip();
    while(writeBuffer.hasRemaining())
        commChannel.write(writeBuffer);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I posted some code, i read data coming in, but don't know how to write data to the distant machine. –  jerome Jul 3 '12 at 12:24
    
I have added some code based on your example. BTW: It doesn't matter how distant the machine is. The code is the same whether the server or client in on the same machine or on the other side of the world. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 3 '12 at 12:33

What generates and read or write event on the Selector SelectionKey?

OP_READ: presence of data or an EOS in the socket receive buffer.

OP_WRITE: room in the socket send buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but it seems to be not possible to generate an event when i want to write on the socket. In the javadoc for Selector.selectedKeys it says that it throws exception if someone attempt to add element to the Set. How generate a writing event then ? –  jerome Jul 3 '12 at 13:37
    
Ok I'm gonna use the SelectionKey from the handleAccept method, pass it to my controller, set its interestOps to OP_WRITE in the controller write method. I think it's gonna work. –  jerome Jul 3 '12 at 13:47
    
@jerome This is only necessary after you have had a zero-length write. For the most part, just call write(). If you get a zero result and there is remaining data, then register OP_WRITE, queue the buffer, etc, and when you don't get a zero result you must unregister OP_WRITE, because it is almost always ready, see my answer. You only get the zero when your send buffer is full. –  EJP Jul 6 '12 at 0:14

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